Fatty Diet Causes Intestinal Tumors, Regardless of BMI

Newswise — PHILADELPHIA – A high-fat-diet-induced immune reaction causes inflammation leading to intestinal cancer in a mouse model – even among animals that are not obese — according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Case Western Reserve University, the Pacific Northwest Research Institute (PNRI), and others. Epidemiological and clinical evidence have linked obesity with inflammation and increased risk of cancer. Up to now, however, the molecular mechanisms linking these three conditions have been elusive. The interdisciplinary team published their findings in Molecular Cancer Research.

“We found that specific types of high-fat diets – based on corn or coconut oils like those found in certain salad dressings and ice cream — are associated with increased tumor formation in a mouse model of intestinal cancer,” said co-senior author John Lambris, PhD, the Dr. Ralph and Sallie Weaver Professor of Research Medicine at Penn. “This model is particularly interesting because it resembles human familial adenomatous polyposis, a condition that carries an 80 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer in individuals with mutations in a tumor suppressor gene called Apc.”

While increased tumor formation was associated with mice fed corn or coconut fats, mice fed diets with olive oil as a source of fat did not develop intestinal polyps, despite being obese. “This observation led us to our first important conclusion that diet, but not necessarily obesity, can promote intestinal cancer,” said co-author Edimara Reis, PhD, a research associate in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. In fact in late September, the FDA decided to give the food industry three years to phase out partially hydrogenated oils, the main source of trans fat in some foods based on corn oil and other types of fat.

Using the mouse model, which was developed by co-senior author Joseph Nadeau from PNRI and first author Stephanie Doerner from Case Western, the team concluded that a high-fat diet (rather than metabolic status) and the chemical composition of the diet are the most important factors for determining cancer risk. “Our results clearly show that eating a high-fat diet is sufficient to increase cancer risk, regardless of obesity,” said co-senior author Nadeau.

The team also noted that tumor formation was caused by inflammation induced by the corn- and coconut-based diets. Notably, inflammation and intestinal tumors in the mice were triggered very soon – three days — after being fed these high-fat diets.

Specifically, the corn- and coconut-based HFDs, not the olive oil-based diet, activated the complement system, an arm of the innate immune system. Complement is an evolutionarily conserved network of proteins that regulate immune responses that destroy foreign invaders. The system is a rapid defense mechanism in most species, from primitive sponges to humans. Complement also has inflammatory functions, and the Lambris lab has been investigating C5aR (the C5a receptor) for more than two decades. In the current study, C5a, a related pro-inflammatory molecule, increased in the intestine and systemically in mice fed corn- and coconut-based HFDs.

“When mice were given a drug to reduce the activity of C5aR, it prevented the development of intestinal tumorigenesis in mice fed corn- and coconut HFDs, indicating that anti-complement therapy could act as an adjuvant with cancer treatments,” Lambris said. The team also surmises that a diet change and complement inhibitors could potentially be beneficial to people with the apc mutation to prevent carcinogenesis.

The team is now working on understanding the exact biochemistry of how certain HFDs activate complement with the production of the C5a molecule.
This work was funded by the National Institutes of Health (U54 CA116867, AI030040, AI068730, P40 RR012305).

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Confusion among nutrition experts: High-fat dairy-product eaters have 40 per cent higher risk of mortality: Journal of the American Dietetic Association

Editor’s Note: Also see Whole-fat dairy products may lower diabetes risk: Harvard study in Annals of Internal Medicine, posted yesterday. The leading causes of death have shifted from infectious diseases to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. These … Continue reading

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Diabetes risk, diet quality linked

Diabetes Care. 2016 Sep 15. pii: dc160574. [Epub ahead of print] Changes in Overall Diet Quality and Subsequent Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Three U.S. Prospective Cohorts. Ley SH1, Pan A2, Li Y3, Manson JE4, Willett WC5, Sun Q6, Hu FB7. … Continue reading

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High-Calcium, Low-Lactose Diet May Reduce Risk of Ovarian Cancer in African-American Women

Newswise — New Brunswick, N.J., September 16, 2016 – Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and and other U.S. health and academic institutions shows a diet high in calcium and low in lactose may reduce the risk of … Continue reading

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Dangerous nutrition advice in the headlines this week

Two prominent items of nutrition news this week seem to me wolves in sheep’s clothing. Superficially, both make innocuous and welcome entries. Just beneath the surface, however, danger lurks. The first of the two was a commentary in the New … Continue reading

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Healthy diet boosts children’s reading skills

A heathy diet is linked to better reading skills in the first three school years, shows a recent study from Finland. Published in the European Journal of Nutrition, the study constitutes part of the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior: Learning, Pediatric Health, Pediatric Health: Middle School, Pediatric Health: Sleep | Leave a comment | Edit

GERD: High-fat/low-carbohydrate diet benefits women

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2016 Sep 1. doi: 10.1111/apt.13784. [Epub ahead of print] Dietary carbohydrate intake, insulin resistance and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a pilot study in European- and African-American obese women. Pointer SD1, Rickstrew J2, Slaughter JC3, Vaezi MF1, Silver HJ1. … Continue reading

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Mediterranean diet better than statins

A Mediterranean diet could be better than statins at reducing the risk of an early death for millions of Britons, research suggests. Leading heart experts said patients should be prescribed the diet – rich in fruit, vegetables, fish, nuts, whole grains … Continue reading

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Alzheimer’s risk higher due to Western diet

Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer’s disease are rising worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of … Continue reading

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New strategies in sport nutrition to increase exercise performance.

Free Radic Biol Med. 2016 Sep;98:144-58. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2016.01.016. Epub 2016 Feb 5. New strategies in sport nutrition to increase exercise performance. Close GL1, Hamilton DL2, Philp A3, Burke LM4, Morton JP5. Author information 1Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science … Continue reading

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All diets work when adhered to

Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2016 Sep;45(3):581-604. doi: 10.1016/j.ecl.2016.04.009. The Role of Macronutrient Content in the Diet for Weight Management. Bray GA1, Siri-Tarino PW2. Author information 1Atherosclerosis Research Program, Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, 5700 Martin Luther King Drive, Oakland, … Continue reading

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Diets avoiding dry-cooked foods can protect against diabetes, say Mount Sinai researchers

Simple changes in how we cook could go a long way towards preventing diabetes, say researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. A new randomized controlled trial, published online July 29 in the journal Diabetologia, found that … Continue reading

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Omega-6 in Stored Fat Tied to Longer Survival

Higher levels of the omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid stored in fat tissue was associated with a lower risk of death in a Swedish prospective cohort study which followed older men for 15 years. Linoleic acid stored in … Continue reading

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Unhealthy diet during pregnancy could be linked to ADHD

New research led by scientists from King’s College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. Published … Continue reading

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Gout Blood Marker Improved by DASH Diet

Effect on uric acid levels nearly matches impact of gout medicines Newswise — A diet rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy and reduced in fats and saturated fats (the DASH diet), designed decades ago to reduce high blood pressure, also … Continue reading

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Eating a Mediterranean diet can slow down cognitive decline

Newswise — Eating a Mediterranean diet can slow down cognitive decline. The Mediterranean diet can improve your mind, as well your heart, shows a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Nutrition. By sticking to the Mediterranean diet the … Continue reading

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Parents who force vegan diets on kids may face jail in Italy

Elvira Savino, from Italy’s Forza Party, says such diets lack nutrients such as iron, zinc, vitamin D and omega-3 Savino says her bill would prevent “radicalised” diets being imposed on youngsters. Vegetarian and vegan diets lack can lack zinc, iron, … Continue reading

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Nutritional geometry: a new framework for how we should eat

Existing models for measuring health impacts of the human diet are limiting our capacity to solve obesity and its related health problems, claim two of the world’s leading nutritional scientists in their newest research. In the latest edition of Annual … Continue reading

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Higher body fat means lower muscular endurance

Physiol Behav. 2016 Jul 26. pii: S0031-9384(16)30573-X. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.07.016. [Epub ahead of print] Body fat percentage is more associated with low physical fitness than with sedentarism and diet in male and female adolescents. García-Pastor T1, Salinero JJ2, Sanz-Frías D3, Pertusa … Continue reading

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How Vegan Diets Can Work For Weight Loss

What dietary changes can I make to make my stomach flat? Would going vegan help? originally appeared on Quora: the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Alina Petre, Sport Dietitian, on … Continue reading

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Dietary Omega-3s Linked to Lowered Colon Cancer Mortality

A diet high in omega-3 fatty acids found in foods such as salmon, walnuts, soybeans, and tofu has been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Now, it may also boost survival after a diagnosis of the disease. A … Continue reading

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U.S. Land Capacity for Feeding People Could Expand with Dietary Changes

Newswise — BOSTON [July 22, 2016]—A new “food-print” model that measures the per-person land requirements of different diets suggests that, with dietary changes, the U.S. could feed significantly more people from existing agricultural land. Using ten different scenarios ranging from … Continue reading

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Malnutrition is becoming a first world problem

SYDNEY, MONDAY 18 JULY, 2016: Australian researchers have discovered that a bad diet has consequences on your immune system even before you notice an increase in body weight. Scientists from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Advanced Molecular … Continue reading

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Your best diet might depend on your genetics

BETHESDA, MD – If you’ve ever seen a friend have good results from a diet but then not been able to match those results yourself, you may not be surprised by new findings in mice that show that diet response … Continue reading

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Medical Weight-Loss Programs Extend Far Beyond Diet

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Lower mortality, higher consumption of unsaturated fats linked

Boston, MA – Consuming higher amounts of unsaturated fats was associated with lower mortality, according to a study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In a large study population followed for more than three decades, researchers found that … Continue reading

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FDA approves J&J’s autoimmune drug Stelara for Crohn’s disease

Johnson & Johnson said on Monday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the company’s blockbuster psoriasis drug, Stelara, for use in adults with Crohn’s disease.

The drug is approved in the United States to treat the skin condition scaly plaque psoriasis and a type of arthritis associated with psoriasis.

Crohn’s is a chronic inflammatory condition in the gastrointestinal tract, causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss and fever. It affects about 700,000 Americans and nearly 250,000 Europeans, according to the company.

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Crohn’s discovery could lead to treatments

Scientists at the University of British Columbia have made a discovery that could potentially lead to treatments for a debilitating complication of Crohn’s disease. Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease in which the intestines of some patients can become … Continue reading

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The omega fats that worsen Crohn’s disease: new Duke study

Durham, NC – Some research has suggested that omega-3 fatty acids, abundant in fish oils, can relieve inflammation in Crohn’s disease. But a new study using software developed by Duke scientists hints that we should be paying closer attention to … Continue reading

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Impact of Crohn’s disease on marital quality of life: A preliminary cross-sectional study

J Crohns Colitis. 2015 Jul 4. pii: jjv121. [Epub ahead of print] Impact of Crohn’s disease on marital quality of life: A preliminary cross-sectional study. Li G1, Ren J2, Wang G1, Gu G1, Ren H1, Chen J1, Wu Q1, Wu … Continue reading

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Vitamin D shows promise for treating Crohn’s disease in pilot study

(June 12, 2015) New research published in this month’s edition of United European Gastroenterology journal suggests that supplementation with vitamin D may impact on the intestinal barrier dysfunction associated with Crohn’s disease, and could have a role in the treatment … Continue reading

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9 Crohn’s symptom-easing foods

Crohn’s patients who took supplementary CLA showed noticeable improvement Probiotics do not prevent relapse in Crohn’s disease patients If you have Crohn’s disease, you want to avoid flare-ups at all costs. Although diet can’t cure it, avoiding or making smart … Continue reading

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Showers may be linked to Crohn’s disease: Lancaster U researchers

Humans may be exposed to bacteria linked with Crohn’s disease through fine spray from showers and rivers according to research led by Lancaster University. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is a bacterial pathogen that causes Johne’s disease in animals, particularly … Continue reading

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First Crohn’s prevention treatment set to launch

Crohn’s disease: our other articles NEW YORK, March 12, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Crohns and Colitis Disease is a chronic disease of the lower intestinal track, causing inflammation and a host of crippling symptoms from ulcers to intestinal rupture. The disease affects … Continue reading

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Drugs cut need for surgery for Crohn’s disease sufferers by more than half

The requirement of bowel surgery is dramatically reduced by up to 60% in patients who develop Crohn’s disease if they receive prolonged treatment with drugs called thiopurines, says a new study. Crohn’s affects more than quarter-of-a-million people in the UK … Continue reading

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Probiotics do not prevent relapse in Crohn’s disease patients

Bethesda, MD — Despite previous data showing beneficial effects, the probiotic Saccharomuces boulardii (S. boulardii) does not prevent clinical relapse in patients with Crohn’s disease, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official clinical practice journal … Continue reading

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Crohn’s disease in children linked to specific virus for first time

A new study reveals that all children with Crohn’s disease that were examined had a commonly occurring virus – an enterovirus – in their intestines. This link has previously not been shown for this chronic inflammatory intestinal disorder. The findings … Continue reading

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New Crohn’s site: an interactive, web-based decision aid to its members in support of shared decision making between patients and their providers

NEW YORK, NY–(Marketwired – May 07, 2013) – The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) introduces an interactive, web-based decision aid to its members in support of shared decision making between patients and their providers. The 25-minute decision aid combines … Continue reading

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Crohn’s: a potential new drug therapy

Ustekinumab, an antibody proven to treat the skin condition psoriasis, has now shown positive results in decreasing the debilitating effects of Crohn’s Disease, according to researchers at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine.  The study will appear in … Continue reading

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Colitis, Crohn’s secrets may be in bone marrow

Michigan State University researchers have unlocked secrets in bone marrow that could lead to improved treatments for colitis and Crohn’s disease. The results, featured in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences, show that the … Continue reading

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A genetic approach for Crohn’s and colitis

NEW YORK, July 3, 2012  /PRNewswire/ — The Jeffrey Epstein VI Foundation, which actively supports science research, has given substantial support to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America to continue its Genetic Initiative to find a cure for the diseases. … Continue reading

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Crohn’s disease care in children should include measurement of bone age

Newswise — Measuring bone age should be a standard practice of care for pediatric patients with Crohn’s disease, in order to properly interpret growth status and improve treatment, according to a new study from the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. “Not … Continue reading

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Crohn’s outcomes better with early introduction of biologic therapy

A large-scale study of medical claims data shows that introducing sophisticated biologic therapies early in the course of treatment for Crohn’s disease improves response to medication and reduces the need for surgery. There is no known cure for Crohn’s disease, … Continue reading

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Crohn’s patients who took supplementary CLA showed noticeable improvement

he Nutritional Immunology and Molecular Medicine Laboratory (NIMML) research team at Virginia Tech has discovered important new information on the efficacy of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in treating Crohn’s disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CLA is a … Continue reading

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MS, Crohn’s drug Tysabri (natalizumab) subject of FDA warning

AUDIENCE: Neurology, Gastroenterology ISSUE: FDA notified healthcare profesisonals that testing positive for anti-JC virus (JCV) antibodies has been identified as a risk factor for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a rare but serious brain infection associated with use of … Continue reading

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Crohn’s: new treatment advice

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Jan;10(1):46-51. Epub 2011 Oct 1. Adverse events do not outweigh benefits of combination therapy for Crohn’s disease in a decision analytic model. Siegel CA, Finlayson SR, Sands BE, Tosteson AN. Source Dartmouth-Hitchcock Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, … Continue reading

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Crohn’s treatment choices should be easier with new imaging technique

Diagnostic tool for distinguishing intestinal inflammation from fibrosis could allow doctors to deliver efficient, timely treatment ANN ARBOR, Mich. — It’s difficult for doctors to tell whether a patient with Crohn’s disease has intestinal fibrosis, which requires surgery, or inflammation, … Continue reading

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Ulcerative colitis, IBS, Crohn’s therapeutics market exhibiting rapid growth

LONDON–(BUSINESS WIRE)–By 2017 the gastrointestinal disorder therapeutics market is expected to be worth $18.3 billion by 2017, according to a new report available on CompaniesandMarkets.com. Gastrointestinal conditions tend to be most common in the elderly, and while the ageing demographic … Continue reading

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Crohn’s drug inhibits brain cancer seizures, may slow tumor growth: UAB study

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Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America seeks IBD patients for internet-based national study

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America today announced that it has opened enrollment for CCFA Partners, a comprehensive Internet-based registry designed to study thousands of patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis under a single research initiative. These chronic … Continue reading

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Crohn’s inflammation eased by naltrexone: Penn State College of Medicine study in the journal Digestive Diseases and Sciences

Naltrexone reduced inflammation in Crohn’s patients in a research study at Penn State College of Medicine. Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract causing abdominal pain, diarrhea, gastrointestinal bleeding and weight loss. Treatments for Crohn’s disease … Continue reading

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New IBD study: Crohn’s is higher the farther north you live; refined sugar a prime suspect

The American College of Gastroenterology published a new evidence-based systematic review on the management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) as a supplement to The American Journal of Gastroenterology (AJG) for April 2011, a special issue entirely dedicated to IBD. This … Continue reading

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COPD Admissions to Reach Crisis Levels by 2030

An epidemic increase in hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) threatens to overwhelm healthcare systems within 15 years, according to findings from a new data-driven forecasting analysis.

Total hospital in-patient days related to COPD are projected to increase by 185% within 15 years barring major advances in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease, Don D. Sin, MD, MPH, and colleagues from the University of British Columbia reported in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.The researchers combined forecasts of population growth and aging among residents of British Columbia with health data to project trends in COPD incidence, prevalence, deaths, and total length of inpatient hospital stays.

Despite steady declines in smoking rates, the researchers projected a 150% increase in COPD cases by 2030 in the Canadian province, with COPD cases among residents age 75 and older rising by 220%.

‘We have two competing factors here with regard to COPD,” Sin told MedPage Today. “One is the decrease in smoking, which should drive down the rate of COPD, but counterbalancing that is the aging of the population, which is driving rates up. COPD is a disease of aging.”

COPD hospitalizations are projected to more than double by 2030 in the Canadian province.

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In COPD patients, physical activity reduces anxiety and depression: European Lung Foundation

A study presented today (5 September, 2016) at this year’s European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in London shows that increased physical activity among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) reduces their risk of anxiety or depression. The study … Continue reading

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COPD Pocket Consultant App a Useful Addition

Beginning in 2011 with the release of the updated GOLD guidelines and the American Thoracic Society guidelines, the evaluation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients changed dramatically. Instead of picking an inhaler or combination of inhalers based on spirometry … Continue reading

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Ex-Smokers With COPD Have Persistent Endothelial Distress

Pulmonary capillary programmed cell death was mostly reversible in healthy smokers who kicked the habit, but not in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who quit smoking, according to findings from a longitudinal study. In the study that examined … Continue reading

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The COPD Pocket Consultant: A Guide from Big Pharma for Navigating COPD Guidelines

COPD is defined as a “common preventable and treatable disease, characterized by airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory response in the airways and the lung to noxious particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities … Continue reading

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COPD: New opioid use in older adults associated with increased risk of death

Older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who start using opioids have a more than two-fold higher risk of dying from a respiratory-related complication compared to non-opioid users, St. Michael’s Hospital researchers have found. When researchers looked specifically at more … Continue reading

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Depression decreases adherence to COPD maintenance medications

A recent study in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society found that in a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries who were newly diagnosed with COPD, adherence to maintenance medications decreased with new episodes of depression. “With a prevalence … Continue reading

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COPD rehab programs can reverse frailty

One in four patients with COPD referred for exercise rehabilitation are frail, but nevertheless can respond favourably to rehabilitation and their frailty can be reversed, finds a new study led by King’s College London and Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS … Continue reading

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New Way to Predict COPD Progression; New Treatment May Be on the Horizon

Newswise — ATS 2016, SAN FRANCISCO ─ New research has found that a process initiated in white blood cells known as neutrophils may lead to worse outcomes for some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The discovery may help … Continue reading

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When Is COPD Not Really COPD?

About half of current and former heavy smokers who did not meet the criteria for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) had respiratory symptoms similar to those seen in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD, researchers reported. Symptoms including respiratory exacerbations, activity limitations, … Continue reading

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Depression worsens COPD symptoms

Debilitating symptoms from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can worsen in patients who also experience depression, research suggests. A new study, published in CHEST Journal, demonstrates a link between an exacerbation of COPD in patients and depression. Patients who had … Continue reading

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Screening for COPD not recommended

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) does not recommend screening for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in persons who do not have symptoms suggestive of COPD. The report appears in the April 5 issue of JAMA. This is a … Continue reading

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Beta-blockers could reduce the risk of COPD exacerbations

Estoril, Portugal: Beta-blockers could be used to reduce the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, according to new findings. Beta blockers are primarily used to treat stress or heart problems, such as high blood pressure and angina, but … Continue reading

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Anxiety disorder 3X more likely among older adults with COPD

Toronto, ON – The prevalence of past-year generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) for adults aged 50 and older with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is much higher compared to older adults without COPD (5.8% vs 1.7%), according to a new study … Continue reading

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COPD and asthma need to be redefined

Defining a patient’s symptoms using the historical diagnostic labels of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an outdated approach to understanding an individual’s condition, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today (Feb. 1, 2016). In … Continue reading

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COPD risk higher for women

Researchers from Lund University Sweden have through a new diagnostic method been able to show that the risk of developing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease could be twice as high for women as it is for men. This means that being … Continue reading

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Tai chi improves physical performance for those with COPD, HF and OA

Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsports-2014-094388 The effect of Tai Chi on four chronic conditions—cancer, osteoarthritis, heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analyses Yi-Wen Chen1, Michael A Hunt1, Kristin L Campbell1, Kortni Peill2, W Darlene Reid3 … Continue reading

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COPD: High opioid use in older people raises safety concerns

TORONTO, Oct. 2, 2015 – Researchers are raising safety concerns about high rates of new opioid use among older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to a new study published today in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. “The … Continue reading

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COPD patients with psychological conditions have higher rate of early hospital readmission

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that people with a psychological condition such as depression, anxiety, psychosis, or alcohol/drug abuse are more likely to be readmitted early into a hospital for complications of chronic obstructive … Continue reading

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COPD, fall risk sometimes linked: study

(Reuters Health) – Older people with a common lung disease are more likely to suffer from falls if they also have other medical problems, previous tumbles or a longer history of smoking, a recent study suggests. Researchers focused on 41 … Continue reading

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COPD and alcohol: a new study

Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Jul 20;10:1363-1370. Self-reported alcohol intake and risk of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a prospective cohort study. Wetherbee EE1, Niewoehner DE1, Sisson JH2, Lindberg SM3, Connett JE3, Kunisaki KM1. Author information … Continue reading

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Risk of COPD may already occur in adolescence: University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of most common causes of death in the world today – active smoking accounting for approx. 85% of all cases. Yet ground-breaking research from the University of Copenhagen indicates that accelerated decline of … Continue reading

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Inhaled corticosteroids for COPD decrease mortality risk from pneumonia and other causes

ATS 2015, DENVER — Treatment of COPD with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may decrease the risk of dying from pneumonia and from other causes despite being associated with an increase in the occurrence of pneumonia, according to a new meta-analysis presented … Continue reading

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COPD is more prevalent in poor and rural areas of the US

ATS 2015, DENVER–Living in a rural area and being poor are risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), said Sarath Raju, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, lead author of a study presented at the 2015 … Continue reading

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For advanced COPD, a simple exercise program is effective: Thai study

J Thorac Dis. 2015 Apr;7(4):637-43. doi: 10.3978/j.issn.2072-1439.2015.04.13. Efficacy of a simple and inexpensive exercise training program for advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in community hospitals. Pothirat C1, Chaiwong W1, Phetsuk N1. Author information 1Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and … Continue reading

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COPD increases sudden cardiac death risk: European Society of Cardiology

People suffering from the common lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), have an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to new research published online today (Wednesday) in the European Heart Journal [1]. When compared with people of … Continue reading

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Students in Bilingual Elementary School Programs Present Worse Academic Results

Bilingual education programs, in which a substantial part of the teaching is done in a language different from the mother tongue and from the language of the students’ surroundings, have been fully established for years in countries such as India, Spain and the United States. In order to analyze the effects of these programs, these researchers evaluated the program that the Autonomous Community of Madrid introduced in a group of public primary schools in 2004.

“We have found a negative effect on the level of competence and knowledge displayed by the students who have followed this bilingual program in those subjects that were taught in English,” states one of the researchers, Jesús Carro, of the UC3M Department of Mathematics. The study, which was recently published in the journal Economic Inquiry, uses data from the test of essential knowledge administered by the Community of Madrid when students complete their elementary education.

“These students and teachers are making an additional effort because they have to teach and learn the subjects in a language that is not theirs. They have to spend more time and make a greater effort to learn English, which can affect their learning of the specific material taught in subjects such as Science, History and Geography,” the researchers explain. Another consideration is that these students take the official exams in Spanish, given that the same test is administered to all the students in the Community of Madrid. “The results are still relevant, because as they progress through the Spanish educational system these students are going to be evaluated in Spanish, and they need to not only have certain knowledge, but to be able to express that knowledge in this language.”

The Parents’ Educational Level

This negative result is more pronounced in those students whose parents have a lower level of education, while the difference is hardly noticeable in students whose parents have a higher level of studies. “We can establish a number of hypotheses with the regard to the reasons behind this, such as that they receive more help at home, they have greater resources, they are more exposed to situations where other languages are used or that are linguistically richer,” comments Jesús Carro. “Because the negative effect is so localized in a specific group of students, it would be easy to establish a tutoring program to solve the problem,” he suggests. Moreover, he points out that none of the students in the bilingual program obtain worse results in the area of reading comprehension in Spanish.

This evaluation only refers to the bilingual program that has been carried out in public schools. “Over the years, a program that is similar to those employed in private charter schools has been implemented, but the results of this study cannot be extrapolated to those schools because it is not clear that they have the same level of teachers prepared to implement the program,” the professor states.

There are several important questions to examine, according to the researchers. The first is to find out what has happened to these students in the following stages of their education. “It’s possible that the negative effect that we have detected will disappear at that point, because in secondary school, the students have a higher level of English,” says Carro, who also proposes another topic to be analyzed:  find out what other factors can influence the program’s results, such a the importance of the teachers’ level of English. “This is relevant both in terms of finding out if that could improve the test results, as well as in terms of getting a better idea of what might be happening with the program in the years following the ones we are analyzing. Over the years, the program has expanded a great deal, and very quickly, in both public schools and charter schools, but it is not so clear that the same number of teachers who are prepared to implement the program are available now as there were during the first years the program was established in public schools. Nobody has studied this, as far as I know,” the professor concludes.

Video (spanish and english subtitles): https://youtu.be/1VO2qE3swcE

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Being Bilingual Changes the Architecture of Your Brain

By Lizzie Wade, in Wired I’d been back from studying abroad in Mexico City for a couple of days when I asked my dad, “Can I use the lavadora?” “The what?” He didn’t speak Spanish. I knew that, of course. … Continue reading

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Bilingual brains better equipped to process information

Speaking more than one language is good for the brain, according to new research that indicates bilingual speakers process information more efficiently and more easily than those who know a single language. The benefits occur because the bilingual brain is … Continue reading

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Are bilingual kids more open-minded?

Our other posts about bilingualism Montreal, March 5, 2014 — There are clear benefits to raising a bilingual child. But could there be some things learning a second language doesn’t produce, such as a more open-minded youngster? New research from … Continue reading

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Bilingual children have two-tracked minds

Newswise — Adults learning a foreign language often need flash cards, tapes, and practice, practice, practice. Children, on the other hand, seem to pick up their native language out of thin air. The learning process is even more remarkable when … Continue reading

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Bilingual children have a better ‘working memory’ than monolingual children

A study conducted at the University of Granada and the University of York in Toronto, Canada, has revealed that bilingual children develop a better working memory –which holds, processes and updates information over short periods of time– than monolingual children. … Continue reading

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Bilingualism fine-tunes hearing, enhances attention

A Northwestern University study that will be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) provides the first biological evidence that bilinguals’ rich experience with language in essence “fine-tunes” their auditory nervous system and helps them juggle … Continue reading

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Dementia symptoms warded off if you are bilingual, says study

New research explains how speaking more than one language may translate to better mental health. A paper published by Cell Press in the March 29th issue of the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences examines how being bilingual can offer protection … Continue reading

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Alzheimer’s onset delayed by bilingualism: first physical evidence

Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital have found that people who speak more than one language have twice as much brain damage as unilingual people before they exhibit symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. It’s the first physical evidence that bilingualism delays the … Continue reading

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One-year-olds notice what others eat

ITHACA, N.Y. – At the dinner table, babies do a lot more than play with their sippy cups, new research suggests. Babies pay close attention to what food is being eaten around them – and especially who is eating it … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior: Learning, Nutrition: Habits, Pediatric Health: Infants | Leave a comment | Edit

FDA allows marketing of first-of-kind computerized cognitive tests to help assess cognitive skills after a head injury

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today permitted marketing of two new devices to assess a patient’s cognitive function immediately after a suspected brain injury or concussion. The Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) and ImPACT Pediatric are the … Continue reading

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If you drop an ant from the top of the Empire State Building, will it die?

Spoiler alert. There is no answer to this, but it is a very funny bit. One of the benefits of being (somewhat) bilingual is you get double the internet content. I feel very blessed to be able to enjoy both … Continue reading

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Why Speaking English as a Second Language May Alter Results of Sideline Concussion Testing

Newswise — SACRAMENTO, CALIF. – Athletes who speak English as a second language may have disparities when completing sideline concussion tests, according to research presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Sacramento, Calif. From youth … Continue reading

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Exercise program in senior centers helps decrease participants’ pain and improve mobility

It may seem counterintuitive that exercise could help people with arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions, but a new study finds that a low-impact exercise program is improving quality of life for many older adults with these conditions. The program, offered … Continue reading

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‘Valley Girl’ dialect expanding to males

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 2, 2013 – The American English speech variant known as uptalk, or “Valley Girl speak” – marked by a rise in pitch at the ends of sentences – is typically associated with young southern Californian females. New … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior: Conformity | 1 Comment | Edit

Speaking a second language may delay dementia, study shows

People who speak more than one language and who develop dementia tend to do so up to five years later than those who are monolingual, according to a study. A team of scientists examined almost 650 dementia patients and assessed … Continue reading

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Exercise Program in Senior Centers Helps Decrease Pain and Improve Mobility of Participants

Newswise — Experts say it’s never too late to reap the benefits of exercise, and a program offered in New York City senior centers is improving quality of life for many older adults. The exercise program, offered by Hospital for … Continue reading

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Bottled water companies partner with White House, First Lady to promote their products

Press release from whitehouse.gov First Lady Michelle Obama to Ask Everyone to “drink Up” with More Water Mrs. Obama will join the Partnership for a Healthier America and more than a dozen organizations to announce new effort to promote drinking … Continue reading

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Learning a new language alters brain development

The age at which children learn a second language can have a significant bearing on the structure of their adult brain, according to a new joint study by the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – The Neuro at McGill University … Continue reading

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So-called universal personality traits, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism, not so widespread?

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) –– For decades, consensus among psychologists has held that a group of five personality traits –– or slight variations of these five –– are a universal feature of human psychology. However, a study by anthropologists at UC … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior, Human Behavior: Charisma, Human Behavior: Deception, Human Behavior: Habits, Human Behavior: Kindness, Human Behavior: Loneliness, Human Behavior: Narcissism, Human Behavior: Negativity, Human Behavior: Optimism, Human Behavior: Popularity, Human Behavior: Relationships, Human Behavior: Shyness | Comments Off on So-called universal personality traits, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism, not so widespread? | Edit

Shrinking California child population signals major changes for state

An unprecedented decline in California’s child population, coupled with a tidal wave of baby boom retirees, will pose significant challenges for the state’s future prosperity, according to an analysis of census data released today by the USC Price School of … Continue reading

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‘Universal’ personality traits don’t necessarily apply to isolated indigenous people

Study of farmer-foragers raises doubt about application of popular personality model WASHINGTON – Five personality traits widely thought to be universal across cultures might not be, according to a study of an isolated Bolivian society. Researchers who spent two years … Continue reading

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CDC awards 2.9 million dollars to help reduce health disparities among Hispanics

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) awarded Su Comunidad Consortium, a Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) program, a $2.9 million intervention grant to address health disparities among Hispanics and Latinos in six states. They will … Continue reading

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Mom’s depression affects kid’s language development, says UBC study

Maternal depression and a common class of antidepressants can alter a crucial period of language development in babies, according to a new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia, Harvard University and the Child & Family Research Institute … Continue reading

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Health-screening kiosks from SoloHealth rolling out in Sam’s Clubs

ATLANTA, Sept. 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ — SoloHealth®, a consumer-driven healthcare technology company, and Sam’s Club, a division of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., announced today that the SoloHealth Station® kiosk will begin to rollout this week in Sam’s Club locations nationwide, making Sam’s … Continue reading

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Why speaking multiple languages can influence children’s emotional development

On the classic TV show “I Love Lucy,” Ricky Ricardo was known for switching into rapid-fire Spanish whenever he was upset, despite the fact Lucy had no idea what her Cuban husband was saying. These scenes were comedy gold, but … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior: Anger, Human Behavior: Anxiety, Human Behavior: Learning, Human Behavior: Love, Human Behavior: Relationships, Human Behavior: Stress, Pediatric Health | Comments Off on Why speaking multiple languages can influence children’s emotional development | Edit
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Shift from meat to plants urged by food company investors

A group of 40 investors managing $1.25 trillion in assets have launched a campaign to encourage 16 global food companies to change the way they source protein for their products to help to reduce environmental and health risks.

The investors, which include the fund arm of insurer Aviva and several Swedish state pension funds, wrote to the food companies on Sept. 23 urging them to respond to the “material” risks of industrial farming and to diversify into plant-based sources of protein.

Among the companies targeted were Kraft Heinz, Nestle, Unilever, Tesco and Walmart, a statement by the Farm Animal Investment Risk & Return Initiative, which organized the investor group, said on Monday.

“The world’s over reliance on factory farmed livestock to feed the growing global demand for protein is a recipe for a financial, social and environmental crisis,” said Jeremy Coller, founder of the FAIRR initiative and chief investment officer at private equity company Coller Capital.

Pollution from intensive livestock production is already at too high a level, while safety and welfare standards are too low and the industry cannot cope with the projected increase in global protein demand, Coller said.

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Red meat: the potential health hazards

J Intern Med. 2016 Sep 6. doi: 10.1111/joim.12543. [Epub ahead of print] Potential health hazards of eating red meat. Wolk A1. Author information 1Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Abstract Red meat (beef, veal, pork, lamb and mutton) … Continue reading

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Chicken: Not a Guilt-Free Alternative to Red Meat

Americans love chicken. On a sandwich, in a nugget, or even as a bread replacement. In the past 50 to 60 years, chicken has gone from a seasonal food usually enjoyed in the summer to an ever-present one. Its availability, … Continue reading

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Bacon, ham and sausages ‘as big a cancer threat as smoking’, WHO to warn

The World Health Organisation (WHO) will publish a report on Monday on the dangers of eating processed meats. It is expected to list processed meat as a cancer-causing substance, while fresh red meat is also expected to be regarded as … Continue reading

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Processed red meat linked to higher risk of heart failure, death in men

Men who eat moderate amounts of processed red meat may have an increased risk of incidence and death from heart failure, according to a study in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal. Processed meats are preserved by smoking, … Continue reading

Posted in Nutrition: Food: Meat, Nutrition: Food: Processed | 1 Comment | Edit

Red meat, cancer link depends on what kind of meat and what kind of cancer, says new study

Associations between Red Meat and Risks for Colon and Rectal Cancer Depend on the Type of Red Meat Consumed 1,2 Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us Rikke Egeberg 3,*, Anja Olsen 3, Jane Christensen 3, Jytte Halkjær … Continue reading

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Meat linked to aggressive prostate cancer: PLoS ONE

Increased consumption of ground beef or processed meat is positively associated with aggressive prostate cancer, according to a study published Nov. 23 in the online journal PLoS ONE. The research team, led by John Witte of University of California, San … Continue reading

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The Elements of a Healthy Diet, and How to Change

By Leo Babauta One of the best things I ever did to change my life (along with exercise, mindfulness, simplicity and focus) is to teach myself to eat a healthy diet. But one of the things that confused me early … Continue reading

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Food health warnings: consumers do not care

Chicago, November 2, 2015 — Last week’s release of a World Health Organization study showing a link between processed and red meat consumption and cancer raises the question, will consumers reduce their intake of these foods?  If history repeats itself, … Continue reading

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Bad, inadequate diet can be as carcinogenic as smoking, says new study

Red meat, which is an important component of many so-called “low carb diets”, can lead to a significantly higher risk of getting cancer of the colon. Why? Professor Jan Erik Paulsen is going to find out. The fact that what … Continue reading

Posted in Cancer, Nutrition, Nutrition: Diets, Nutrition: Information, Nutrition: Information: Confusion | 2 Comments | Edit
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The 7 most common Medicare myths

Social Security is often anointed as the most important social program in the U.S. because of the income it provides retired workers each month. But you’d be making a mistake if you didn’t put Medicare, the program designed to provide medical care primarily to seniors aged 65 and up, in the same discussion.

According to an analysis conducted by the Urban Institute, the cumulative lifetime benefits for a median income 65-year-old are estimated to be higher from Medicare than Social Security by the year 2055. In other words, the importance of Medicare is growing, especially on account of the medical inflation rate handily outpacing both the national inflation rate and wage growth.

Despite Medicare’s being a critical program for seniors, there’s a lot about it that’s simply misunderstood. Unfortunately, if you misunderstand Medicare it could come back to haunt you in your pocketbook. Here are seven of the most common myths associated with Medicare.

1. Medicare is free

Arguably one of the biggest Medicare misconceptions is that since it’s a critically important social program, it’s free. In reality, though some aspects of the program may be offered “free,” retirees are expected cover certain expenses on their own.

For example, Part A, otherwise known as hospital insurance, has no premium attached if you’ve earned 40 work credits throughout your lifetime. However, Medicare Part B (outpatient services) has a standard premium of $121.80 in 2016. Part D, or prescription drug plans, also requires a monthly premium.

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3 Medicare Mistakes That Could Be Costing You a Fortune

There are few programs that are more important for seniors than Medicare. And the role it plays in ensuring the health and financial well-being of older Americans is only expected to grow. On one hand, the older American population is … Continue reading

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T1D Bulletin: Judge says Medicare Must Cover CGM

A Medicare provider must cover a continuous blood glucose monitor (CGM) for one of its patients with type 1 diabetes, an administrative law judge has ruled. The patient, Jill Whitcomb, had recently become eligible for Medicare, which does not cover … Continue reading

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Rural Medicare Beneficiaries Receive Less Follow-Up Care

Newswise — August 14, 2015- Medicare patients in rural areas have lower rates of follow-up care after leaving the hospital—which may place them at higher risk of emergency department (ED) visits and repeat hospitalizations, according to a study in the … Continue reading

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Medicare May Soon Cover Exercise Regimen for Osteoarthritis

Newswise — Fit & Strong!, an exercise program tailored to break the cycle of weakening and pain in older adults with osteoarthritis and developed at the University of Illinois at Chicago, may soon be covered by Medicare. The program has … Continue reading

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What Medicare and Medicaid’s Ratings Really Say About Nursing Homes

For all of its flaws, Medicare and Medicaid’s Nursing Home Compare five-star rating system gives consumers a head-start when searching for a facility. Now, the Kaiser Family Foundation has taken a closer look at the ratings, and reached some interesting … Continue reading

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CT Lung Cancer Screening is Cost Effective: Full Medicare Coverage Should Follow: New Study

Newswise — Reston, Va. (Sept. 2, 2014) – Questions regarding effectiveness, infrastructure and cost effectiveness of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening of those at high risk for lung cancer have now been answered. Medicare should rapidly provide full national coverage … Continue reading

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About 1 in 5 Medicare patients is discharged from hospice care alive

About 1 in 5 Medicare patients is discharged from hospice care alive, whether due to patients’ informed choice, a change in their condition, or inappropriate actions by the hospice to save on hospitalization costs related to terminal illness. How live … Continue reading

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Lung cancer screening coverage via Medicare getting more support

Newswise — Chicago – A large number of United States Senators and Representatives are taking the lead to support full Medicare coverage of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for seniors at high risk for lung cancer. Through grassroots advocacy from … Continue reading

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Medicare patients with dementia 20 percent more likely to be readmitted

PROVIDENCE, R.I. – A review of more than 25,000 admissions of Medicare beneficiaries to Rhode Island hospitals has found that patients with a documented diagnosis of dementia are nearly 20 percent more likely to be readmitted within 30 days than … Continue reading

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Telemedicine can reduce hospitalizations of nursing home residents and generate savings for Medicare

Authors: David C. Grabowski and A. James O’Malley Journal: Health Affairs, Feb. 2014 33(2):244–50 Contact: David C. Grabowski, Ph.D., Professor of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, grabowski@hcp.med.harvard.edu Summary Writers: Martha Hostetter Synopsis   Nursing homes that used telemedicine to … Continue reading

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Nutritional intervention may help decrease 30-day readmission rates among Medicare patients

In the U.S., one in five Medicare patients is readmitted to a hospital each year at an estimated cost of $17.5 billion annually.i To reduce this impact, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has introduced hospital penalties based on readmissions conditions … Continue reading

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NEW: Medicare for Dummies

Since the creation of Medicare in 1965, significant changes have affected the legislation. With 77 million baby boomers entering the program, questions about what Medicare is and how it affects seniors are certain to arise. Medicare For Dummies addresses this … Continue reading

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Many seniors wrongly think public health insurance exchanges are replacing Medicare plans

ST. LOUIS, Sept. 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — As the nation approaches open enrollment for new public health insurance exchanges and Medicare, a new survey shows major misconceptions among seniors over how healthcare reform impacts Medicare benefits. This knowledge gap, coupled with … Continue reading

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Generic and therapeutic drug substitutions can help lower Medicare costs

Therapeutic drug substitutions have the potential to double or even triple annual cost savings compared with savings achieved with generic substitutions, according to O. Kenrik Duru and colleagues from the University of California, Los Angeles. Therapeutic drug substitutions involve the … Continue reading

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HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on the 48th Anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid

Today, we mark the 48th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid becoming law, a sacred promise our country made to older Americans and low-income working Americans and families that they will have the medical care they need to live healthier lives. … Continue reading

Posted in Health Care, Health Care: Medicaid, Health Care: Medicare | 1 Comment | Edit

Not authorized to prescribe drugs? Medicare pays anyway.

by Jennifer LaFleur, Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, ProPublica, June 24, 2013, 8:47 a.m. Hundreds of thousands of times each year, Medicare pays for prescriptions purportedly written by massage therapists, athletic trainers, interpreters and others who aren’t allowed to prescribe … Continue reading

Posted in Health Care: Ethics, Health Care: Medicare | Comments Off on Not authorized to prescribe drugs? Medicare pays anyway. | Edit

HHS: Medicare savings from ACA is a little over a dollar a day through 2022

Because of the health care law – the Affordable Care Act – the average person with traditional Medicare will save $5,000 from 2010 to 2022, according to a report today from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. People … Continue reading

Posted in Health Care: Medicare, Health Care: Reform | Comments Off on HHS: Medicare savings from ACA is a little over a dollar a day through 2022 | Edit

Medicare approval process problems for power wheelchairs

NEW YORK, July 10, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — For more than 25 years, Dr. Meg Allyn Krilov has practiced rehabilitation medicine in New York City, prescribing hundreds of power wheelchairs to patients in need of mobility assistance to improve their quality of … Continue reading

Posted in Disabilities, Health Care: Costs, Health Care: Health Insurance, Health Care: Medicare | Comments Off on Medicare approval process problems for power wheelchairs | Edit

Why new Medicare regulations penalizing hospitals for high readmission rates may be ineffective at improving care

More hospital readmissions posts Differences in regional hospital readmission rates for heart failure are more closely tied to the availability of care and socioeconomics than to hospital performance or patients’ degree of illness, according to research presented at the American … Continue reading

Posted in Health Care: Medical Errors: Hospital Readmissions | Comments Off on Why new Medicare regulations penalizing hospitals for high readmission rates may be ineffective at improving care | Edit

Patients often stop taking heart drugs during Medicare coverage gaps

Patients who paid for heart medications solely through Medicare were 57 percent more likely to not take them during coverage gaps compared to those who had a Part D low-income subsidy or additional insurance, according to research published in Circulation: … Continue reading

Posted in Health Care: Medicare, Human Behavior: Personal Responsibility, Pharmaceuticals: Compliance | Comments Off on Patients often stop taking heart drugs during Medicare coverage gaps | Edit

Pre-nursing home hospitalization of dementia patients incurs sizable Medicare costs

A new study that tracked what Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders (ADRD) costs Medicare during three distinct stages of patient care suggests that the government insurer could realize substantial savings through efforts to reduce the hospitalizations that occur before patients … Continue reading

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HHS: Health reform helps more than 5.1 million people with Medicare save over $3.2 billion

As the second anniversary of the Affordable Care Act approaches, new data shows that more than 5.1 million seniors and people with disabilities on Medicare saved over $3.2 billion on prescription drugs because of the new health care law, Kathleen … Continue reading

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HHS: Health reform law saves 2.1 billion dollars for 3.6 million Americans with Medicare

Nearly 3.6 million people with Medicare saved $2.1 billion on their prescription drugs in 2011 thanks to the Affordable Care Act according to data issued today by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Savings for people with Medicare … Continue reading

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Gym benefits help Medicare plans recruit healthy seniors

Because healthy enrollees cost them less, Medicare Advantage plans would profit from selecting seniors based on their health, but Medicare strictly forbids practices such as denying coverage based on existing conditions. Another way to build a more profitable membership is … Continue reading

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Commercial disease management models do not work for Medicare patients: NEJM

Newswise — WASHINGTON—At a time when everyone is looking for ways to reduce health care costs in America, using commercial disease management programs to reduce the fee-for-service Medicare costs associated with chronic conditions among senior citizens seems like a practical … Continue reading

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Posted in Health Care: Medicare | Leave a comment

A 5-question quiz to see if you are a jerk

Newswise — RIVERSIDE, California – Are you a jerk? How do you know? Jerk self-knowledge is hard to come by, says Eric Schwitzgebel, a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Riverside.

Schwitzgebel posited a Theory of Jerks in Aeon Magazine in 2014 and has revisited the topic a few times in his blog, “The Splintered Mind.” He continued that exploration this month in Nautilus in an article titled “How to Tell If You’re a Jerk,” and today blogged a five-question quiz to help determine personal levels of what he refers to a “jerkitude.”

Schwitzgebel defines a jerk as “someone who culpably fails to appreciate the perspectives of others around him, treating them as tools to be manipulated or fools to be dealt with rather than as moral and epistemic peers. The jerk faces special obstacles to self-knowledge of his moral character, partly because of his disregard of the opinions of people who could give him useful critical feedback.”

“There are, presumably, genuine jerks in the world. And many of those jerks, presumably, have a pretty high moral opinion of themselves, or at least a moderate opinion of themselves,” he writes in the Nautilus essay. “They don’t think of themselves as jerks, because jerk self-knowledge is hard to come by.”

There is no official scientific designation that matches the full range of ordinary application of the term “jerk” to the guy who rudely cuts you off in line, the teacher who casually humiliates the students, and the co-worker who turns every staff meeting into a battle, he acknowledges.

“The scientifically recognized personality categories closest to ‘jerk’ are the ‘dark triad’ of narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychpathic personality,” he explains. “Narcissists regard themselves as more important than the people around them, which jerks also implicitly or explicitly do. And yet narcissism is not quite jerkitude, since it also involves a desire to be the center of attention, a desire that jerks don’t always have. Machiavellian personalities tend to treat people as tools they can exploit for their own ends, which jerks also do. And yet this too is not quite jerkitude, since Machivellianism involves self-conscious cynicism, while jerks can often be ignorant of their self-serving tendencies. People with psychopathic personalities are selfish and callous, as is the jerk, but they also incline toward impulsive risk-taking, while jerks can be calculating and risk-averse.”

Schwitzgebel says there is likely no correlation between people’s self-opinion about their degree of jerkitude and their true degree of jerkitude.

Hence the quiz.

The Jerk Quiz

1. You’re waiting in a line at the pharmacy. What are you thinking?
(a) Did I forget anything on my shopping list?
(b) Should I get ibuprofen or acetaminophen? I never can keep them straight.
(c) Oh no, I’m so sorry, I didn’t mean to bump you.
(d) These people are so damned incompetent! Why do I have to waste my time with these fools?

2. At the staff meeting, Peter says that your proposal probably won’t work. You think:
(a) Hm, good point but I bet I could fix that.
(b) Oh, Loretta is smiling at Peter again. I guess she agrees with him and not me, darn it. But I still think my proposal is probably better than his.
(c) Shoot, Peter’s right. I should have thought of that!
(d) Peter the big flaming ass. He’s playing for the raise. And all the other idiots here are just eating it up!

3. You see a thirty-year-old guy walking down the street with steampunk goggles, pink hair, dirty sneakers, and badly applied red lipstick. You think:
(a) Different strokes for different folks!
(b) Hey, is that a new donut shop on the corner?
(c) I wish I were that brave. I bet he knows how to have fun.
(d) Get a job already. And at least learn how to apply the frickin lipstick.

4. At a stop sign, a pedestrian is crossing slowly in front of your car. You think:
(a) Wow, this tune on my radio has a fun little beat!
(b) My boss will have my hide if I’m late again. Why did I hit snooze three times?
(c) She looks like she’s seen a few hard knocks. I bet she has a story or two to tell.
(d) Can’t this bozo walk any faster? What a lazy slob!

5. The server at the restaurant forgets that you ordered the hamburger with chili. There’s the burger on the table before you, with no chili. You think:
(a) Whatever. I’ll get the chili next time. Fewer calories anyway.
(b) Shoot, no chili. I really love chili on a burger! Argh, let’s get this fixed. I’m hungry!
(c) Wow, how crowded this place is. She looks totally slammed. I’ll try catch her to fix the order next time she swings by.
(d) You know, there’s a reason that people like her are stuck in loser jobs like this. If I was running this place I’d fire her so fast you’d hear the sonic boom two miles down the street.

How many times did you answer (d)?

0: Sorry, I don’t believe you.
1-2: Yeah, fair enough. Same with the rest of us.
3-4: Ouch. Is this really how you see things most of the time? I hope you’re just being too hard on yourself.
5: Yes, you are being too hard on yourself. Either that, or please step forward for the true-blue jerk gold medal!

(The quiz is for entertainment and illustration purposes only, Schwitzgebel says. “I don’t take it seriously as a diagnostic measure!”)

Also see

Postpartum Psychosis Big Risk for Mothers with Bipolar Disorder

CHICAGO — Pregnant women with bipolar disorder and their families and physicians should be aware of a significantly higher risk for developing postpartum psychosis, according to a new Northwestern Medicine review of literature on the rare and under-researched disorder. Postpartum … Continue reading

Posted in Mental Health: Bipolar Disorder, Mental Health: Depression, Mental Health: Psychosis, Pregnancy: Depression | Leave a comment | Edit

Investigating the Relationship Between Low Physical Activity and Psychotic Symptoms

Newswise — Physical activity can help reduce cardiovascular disease and premature mortality in people with psychological problems. However, there is limited data on exercise in people with serious mental disorders, especially from low- and middle-income countries. This study explored whether … Continue reading

Posted in Exercise: Benefits | Leave a comment | Edit

Psychopaths feel fear but see no danger

Researchers from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Radboud University Nijmegen found proof that psychopathic individuals can feel fear, but have trouble in the automatic detection and responsivity to threat. For many decades fear has been put forth as a hallmark feature … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior: Fear, Human Behavior: Psychopaths | Leave a comment | Edit

Homelessness Linked to Poor Antipsychotic Medication Adherence

SFU health sciences researcher Stefanie Rezansoff has published a new study on the treatment of serious mental illnesses among people who are homeless. This is the first study to investigate adherence to antipsychotic medication in this population. She found only … Continue reading

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Epilepsy drugs may cause psychotic disorders

Today Brain publishes a new study indicating that antiepileptic drugs designed to reduce seizures, may also induce psychotic disorders in some patients. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. People with epilepsy have increased vulnerability to psychiatric problems. … Continue reading

Posted in Epilepsy, Health Care: Medical Errors | Comments Off on Epilepsy drugs may cause psychotic disorders | Edit

Single people have richer social lives, more psychological growth than married people

Newswise — DENVER — Dating shows, dating apps – they all strive to make sure none of us end up uncoupled forever. But it turns out many single people embrace their single lives, and are likely to experience more psychological … Continue reading

Posted in Marriage, Single | Comments Off on Single people have richer social lives, more psychological growth than married people | Edit

Psychoanalyzing Trump harms mental-health care

Humans are naturally inclined to try explaining things that don’t make sense, and Donald Trump’s behavior falls far beyond what anyone expects of a politician. “However, human behavior is extraordinarily complex, and therapists sometimes meet with patients for years before they think … Continue reading

Posted in Mental Health: Psychotherapy | Comments Off on Psychoanalyzing Trump harms mental-health care | Edit

Breakfast consumption has no effect on neuropsychological functioning in children: a repeated-measures clinical trial

Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Jul 27. pii: ajcn132043. [Epub ahead of print] Breakfast consumption has no effect on neuropsychological functioning in children: a repeated-measures clinical trial. Iovino I1, Stuff J2, Liu Y2, Brewton C3, Dovi A3, Kleinman R4, Nicklas … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Breakfast consumption has no effect on neuropsychological functioning in children: a repeated-measures clinical trial | Edit

Cancer therapy nausea eased by antipsychotic drug olanzapine

(Reuters Health) – Adding the cheap antipsychotic drug olanzapine to conventional anti-vomiting medicine can help prevent nausea in cancer patients, according to a new test of 380 volunteers. During the first 24 hours after chemotherapy, 74 percent of patients receiving … Continue reading

Posted in Cancer | Comments Off on Cancer therapy nausea eased by antipsychotic drug olanzapine | Edit

Physiological and Psychological Effects of a Walk in Urban Parks in Fall

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Nov 9;12(11):14216-28. doi: 10.3390/ijerph121114216. Physiological and Psychological Effects of a Walk in Urban Parks in Fall. Song C1, Ikei H2,3, Igarashi M4, Takagaki M5, Miyazaki Y6. Author information 1Center for Environment, Health and … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Physiological and Psychological Effects of a Walk in Urban Parks in Fall | Edit

Evidence of Racial and Class Discrimination Among Psychotherapists

Newswise — WASHINGTON, DC, May 25, 2016 — A new study suggests that psychotherapists discriminate against prospective patients who are black or working class. “Although I expected to find racial and class-based disparities, the magnitude of the discrimination working-class therapy … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Evidence of Racial and Class Discrimination Among Psychotherapists | Edit

Lipid testing underutilized in adults taking antipsychotic medications

Too few adults taking antipsychotic medications are being screened for abnormalities in lipids, which include cholesterol and triglycerides, new research from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus finds. The biggest gap in screening is among adults age 40 and … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Lipid testing underutilized in adults taking antipsychotic medications | Edit

Psychological Flexibility Might Be the Key to Better Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions

Newswise — AUSTIN, May 14, 2016 – Although numerous studies prove that Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is effective in chronic pain treatment, psychologists acknowledge they need to learn which components of CBT provide the best outcomes for different people with … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Psychological Flexibility Might Be the Key to Better Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions | Edit

More Psychotic Symptoms Among Children in Cities; New Study Explores Why

Durham, NC – Lower social cohesion among neighbors and higher crime rates contribute to higher rates of psychotic symptoms among urban children, a new study from researchers at Duke University and King’s College London finds. Previous research has also identified … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on More Psychotic Symptoms Among Children in Cities; New Study Explores Why | Edit

Psychotherapy should be first choice to treat chronic insomnia

(Reuters Health) – People with chronic insomnia should try cognitive behavioral therapy before medications, suggests a prominent group of U.S. doctors. While the American College of Physicians (ACP) can’t say cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) outperforms medications for chronic insomnia, the … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Psychotherapy should be first choice to treat chronic insomnia | Edit

Psilocybin, the active component of Mexican magic mushrooms, reduces psychological pain after social exclusion

Social problems are key characteristics in psychiatric disorders and are insufficiently targeted by current treatment approaches. By applying brain imaging methods, researchers at the University of Zurich now show that a small amount of psilocybin changes the processing of social … Continue reading

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Demystify the core concepts of cognitive psychology

Written specifically for psychology students – and not other academics – Cognitive Psychology For Dummies is an accessible and entertaining introduction to the field. Unlike the dense and jargon-laden content found in most psychology textbooks, this practical guide provides readers … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Demystify the core concepts of cognitive psychology | Edit

White House Report: Threat of Climate Change Found to Be Key Psychological and Emotional Stressor

Newswise — Bethesda, Md. – Climate change is a significant threat to the health of Americans, creating unprecedented health problems in areas where they might not have previously occurred, according to a report released April 4 by the White House. … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on White House Report: Threat of Climate Change Found to Be Key Psychological and Emotional Stressor | Edit

Parkinson’s psychosis drug gets FDA panel approval

An advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration backed an approval for Acadia Pharmaceuticals Inc’s drug for psychosis related to Parkinson’s disease. Nuplazid’s benefits outweighed the risks, the panel said, after 12 members voted in favor of the … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Parkinson’s psychosis drug gets FDA panel approval | Edit

Psychotherapy for Depressed Rats Shows Genes Aren’t Destiny: Northwestern

Newswise — CHICAGO — Genes are not destiny in determining whether an individual will suffer from depression, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. Environment is a major factor, and nurture can override nature. When rats genetically bred for depression received … Continue reading

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Long-term effects of very low-carbohydrate and high-carbohydrate weight-loss diets on psychological health in obese adults with type 2 diabetes: randomized controlled trial.

J Intern Med. 2016 Mar 23. doi: 10.1111/joim.12501. [Epub ahead of print] Long-term effects of very low-carbohydrate and high-carbohydrate weight-loss diets on psychological health in obese adults with type 2 diabetes: randomized controlled trial. Brinkworth GD1, Luscombe-Marsh ND1,2, Thompson CH2, … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Long-term effects of very low-carbohydrate and high-carbohydrate weight-loss diets on psychological health in obese adults with type 2 diabetes: randomized controlled trial. | Edit

Antipsychotic drugs may not be effective against delirium

A recent review of the medical literature does not support the use of antipsychotic medications for preventing or treating delirium in hospitalized patients. Investigators analyzed 19 relevant studies. In seven studies comparing antipsychotics with placebo or no treatment for delirium … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Antipsychotic drugs may not be effective against delirium | Edit

Antipsychotic drugs linked to increased mortality among Parkinson’s disease patients

PHILADELPHIA — At least half of Parkinson’s disease patients experience psychosis at some point during the course of their illness, and physicians commonly prescribe antipsychotic drugs, such as quetiapine, to treat the condition. However, a new study by researchers at … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | Comments Off on Antipsychotic drugs linked to increased mortality among Parkinson’s disease patients | Edit

Exercise helps young people with psychosis symptoms, study shows

An exercise programme devised by researchers at the University of Manchester has dramatically reduced symptoms among young people with first-episode psychosis. The long-term prospects for young people who are diagnosed with psychosis are typically poor, with high rates of relapse, … Continue reading

Posted in Exercise: Benefits, Mental Health: Psychosis | Comments Off on Exercise helps young people with psychosis symptoms, study shows | Edit

Many women go for narcissism, Machiavellianism and psychopathy in their men

A paper co-authored by a researcher from the University’s Institute of Psychology, Health and Society states that women are generally drawn to men with dark and brooding looks. This in turn may relate to their reproductive success. University researcher, Dr … Continue reading

Posted in Human Behavior: Narcissism, Human Behavior: Relationships, Mental Health: Psychopathy | 1 Comment | Edit
Posted in Human Behavior: Psychopaths, Human Behavior: Rudeness, Human Behavior: Values | Leave a comment

What’s the Most Loving Thing You Can Do?

What’s the Most Loving Thing You Can Do?

By Leo Babauta

The question I’ve been asking myself lately, before I do anything, is a deceptively simple one: “What’s the most loving thing you can do in this situation?

Now, that might sound corny to some of you, might seem irrelevant to most of you. But give me one minute of your time to explain.

I’ve been experimenting for awhile with letting go. Not running when I have uncertainty, fear, discomfort. Not acting on my fears or frustrations. Not letting these things drive me, but sitting still with them instead, and facing them with courage.

That’s wonderful, but what if you actually need to act? You could sit still all day, but then you’d never help anyone, never create anything, never do anything.

So there’s a need to not act, to sit still … and there’s a need to act. How do we determine which is which?

By asking that question. “What’s the most loving thing you can do in this situation?”

When you’re about to take an action (including running away, going away from uncertainty to comfort, procrastinating, going to distractions or comfort food) … stop and sit still.

Turn inward and see if fear or stress is coming up, see if you’re feeling uncertainty and wanting to cope by getting control. See if you’re trying to comfort yourself, or to lash out, to close down.

In this case, the most loving thing you can do is nothing.

The most loving thing you can do, for yourself and others, is to sit still. Face the fear and uncertainty. Not act out wanting to control these emotions, wanting to comfort yourself.

But in other cases, you want to take action. Doing your work, for example, could be something that helps you or your team or the world. Taking care of someone, talking to them, being there for them, serving them … those can be very helpful things to do.

In these cases, acting to help yourself or someone else is the most loving thing you can do.

If I’m going to read with my kid, take a walk with my wife, clean the kitchen for my family, write a book for my readers … these are loving acts.

If I’m running to check email or social media because I want something easy to do instead of writing that book for my readers … the loving act is to sit still and face this discomfort, fear and uncertainty.

When I’m talking to someone out of frustration, the most loving thing I can do is to refrain from trying to criticize or control them or be defensive. Instead, I can face this frustration. When I calm myself down, I can talk to them in a loving way and try to help them, try to empathize with them, try to be there for them.

Each time I’m about to act, the best thing I can do is ask that question: What’s the most loving thing you can do in this situation? I might not always remember, but when I do, it is always a helpful question.

Note: If you’d like to dive into mindfulness, check out my Beginner’s Guide to Mindfulness here.

Posted in Human Behavior: Love | Leave a comment

What It’s Like to Have Irritable Bowel Syndrome

I wake up one morning certain that I’ve become three months pregnant overnight. The farting starts immediately. I skip breakfast, spend a half hour searching for pants I can zip over my bloated stomach, and then hurry to work and sit at my desk by the door of a tiny office crammed with four editors. My belly doesn’t rumble, but buzzes and shrieks. I shift in my chair to hide the cacophony.

Four hours pass. I take trips to the bathroom to stand in the stall and let it all out. My boss calls me into her office and I rise, suck it in, and waddle to her. Yes, of course I’ll look at the brochure. Lunch time arrives. I cautiously eat some bread and peanut butter, then smell something rankish and panic. Did I just leak gas without knowing? No, someone is heating a cheesy burrito in the microwave.

Exhausted at the end of the day, I flatulate my way back home. I eat my first real meal of the day and continue to pass wind every 10 minutes, like clockwork, until bedtime. The funk makes it hard to sleep. The next morning, I rush to the bathroom, decide to risk breakfast, then stop at the door on my way out to run back for round two.

More

Also see

Irritable bowel syndrome patients often go without medical care and self-treat

National survey finds many go undiagnosed, and disease and its effect on quality of life seen as misunderstood. New Health Union site looks to provide support and information Philadelphia, June 28, 2016 – A new national survey by Health Union … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology: IBS | Comments Off on Irritable bowel syndrome patients often go without medical care and self-treat | Edit

Migraine, Tension Headaches and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Linked?

Newswise — MINNEAPOLIS – Migraine and tension-type headaches may share genetic links with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 68th Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada, … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology: IBS, Headaches: Migraines | Comments Off on Migraine, Tension Headaches and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Linked? | Edit

Hay fever medicine reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome

Researchers from KU Leuven, Belgium, have identified the cause of abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). As a result, they were able to select a medicine that could reduce or end that pain. This medicine is already … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology: IBS, Hay Fever | Comments Off on Hay fever medicine reduces symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome | Edit

Very little evidence for cutting out certain carbs to ease irritable bowel: Value of FODMAP diet, developed in Australia to curb symptoms, questioned: BMJ

There is very little evidence to recommend avoiding certain types of dietary carbohydrate, known as the FODMAP diet, to ease the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS for short, concludes a review of the available data in Drug and … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology: IBS | Comments Off on Very little evidence for cutting out certain carbs to ease irritable bowel: Value of FODMAP diet, developed in Australia to curb symptoms, questioned: BMJ | Edit

Irritable bowel syndrome patients find pain treatments less effective

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that the immune system is defective in people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, which is a major reason why sufferers have ongoing issues with pain. The research – the first of its kind in … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology: IBS, Pain, Painkillers | 1 Comment | Edit

New form of irritable bowel syndrome found by UCLA researchers

UCLA researchers have described a new form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that occurs after an acute bout of diverticulitis, a finding that may help lead to better management of symptoms and relief for patients. The discovery of this new … Continue reading

Posted in Diverticulitis, Gastroenterology: IBS | 1 Comment | Edit

Vulvodynia related to irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis

Millions of women suffer from unexplained vulvar pain so severe it can make intercourse, exercise and even sitting unbearable. New research now shows that women with this painful vaginal condition known as vulvodynia are two to three times more likely … Continue reading

Posted in Fibromyalgia, Gastroenterology: IBS, Vulvodynia, Women’s Health | Comments Off on Vulvodynia related to irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia and interstitial cystitis | Edit

For irritable bowel disease, rifaximin is the safest targeted antibiotic treatment: Cedars-Sinai study

LOS ANGELES (Nov. 1, 2011) – Among the most commonly used treatments for irritable bowel syndrome – which affects as many as 20 percent of the United States population – a targeted antibiotic was shown to be the safest in … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology: IBD | Tagged | Comments Off on For irritable bowel disease, rifaximin is the safest targeted antibiotic treatment: Cedars-Sinai study | Edit

Irritable bowel syndrome relieved by peppermint: Adelaide University study

University of Adelaide researchers have shown for the first time how peppermint helps to relieve Irritable Bowel Syndrome, which affects up to 20% of the population. In a paper published this week in the international journal Pain, researchers from the … Continue reading

Posted in Alternative Medicine, Gastroenterology | Comments Off on Irritable bowel syndrome relieved by peppermint: Adelaide University study | Edit

Irritable bowel symptoms improve with exercise: new study

The study, which was conducted at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg and at Alingsås Hospital, included 102 IBS patients between the ages of 18 and 65. Half the group was randomly allocated to increase their physical activity and the other … Continue reading

Posted in Gastroenterology, Gastroenterology: IBD | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Irritable bowel symptoms improve with exercise: new study | Edit

Mind-body therapies and bowel disorders

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Although some health care providers may overlook alternative therapies when treating functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, University of Florida faculty members have found evidence that hypnosis and cognitive behavioral therapy may benefit patients suffering … Continue reading

Posted in Alternative Medicine, Gastroenterology, Mind-Body Connection | Comments Off on Mind-body therapies and bowel disorders | Edit

New bowel cancer detection device

The Basque Centre for Research into Microtechnologies, CIC microGUNE, has developed a device, currently at a prototype stage, capable of rapidly diagnosing and monitoring cancer of the colon simply by analysing blood drops from the patient. Bowel cancer is the … Continue reading

Posted in Cancer: Bowel | Comments Off on New bowel cancer detection device | Edit

The significance of seaweed: Marine macroalgae removes large amounts of atmospheric carbon

Our understanding of the global carbon cycle has been reshaped by KAUST researchers who have helped to reveal a major role for the abundance of seaweed growing around the world’s coasts. Some years ago, Carlos Duarte, now director of the … Continue reading

Posted in Environmental Health: Algae, Seaweed | Leave a comment | Edit

Seaweed industry gets a warning

A rising number of valuable uses being found for seaweed — from food and fertilizer to pharmaceuticals and industrial gels — is driving the rapid growth of an industry that could easily and needlessly drop into some of the same … Continue reading

Posted in Seaweed | Leave a comment | Edit

Altering meal frequency has little impact on body weight, plasma lipids, or glucoregulatory factors

Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2016 Oct;23(5):379-383. Meal frequency and timing: impact on metabolic disease risk. Varady KA1. Author information 1Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of … Continue reading

Posted in Cholesterol, Metabolic Disease, Metabolic Syndrome, Nutrition: Appetite, Nutrition: Calorie Restriction, Nutrition: Habits | Leave a comment | Edit

Gut Bacteria Could Tip Balance in Developing Celiac Disease or Staying Healthy

Newswise — Hamilton, ON (August 24, 2016) — About 40 per cent of the population have a genetic disposition to celiac disease, but only about one per cent develop the autoimmune condition when exposed to gluten, and this could be … Continue reading

Posted in Celiac Disease, Nutrition: Gut | Leave a comment | Edit

Fecal Microbiota Transplantation and Its Usage in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Clin Psychopharmacol Neurosci. 2016 Aug 31;14(3):231-7. doi: 10.9758/cpn.2016.14.3.231. Evrensel A1, Ceylan ME1. Author information 1Department of Psychiatry, Uskudar University, Istanbul, Turkey. Abstract Fecal microbiota transplantation has a 1700-year history. This forgotten treatment method has been put into use again during … Continue reading

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Gene related to Down syndrome and miscarriage identified

GENETICISTS have identified an enzyme which regulates the production of sperm and egg cells in human reproduction. The discovery furthers our understanding of a process which can often go wrong, resulting in miscarriage or infants born with Down’s Syndrome, Edwards’s … Continue reading

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New Guidelines for Nausea, Stomach Pain and Other Problems Help Physicians Better Diagnose, Treat Kids

Newswise — A child feels nauseated all the time, but no medical test can find what is wrong. Or a child vomits regularly, but there’s no illness or eating disorder to explain it. These, and other stomach and bowel-related problems … Continue reading

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Do anorexia, IBS and chronic fatigue share a common cause?

Irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome and anorexia nervosa may all have a common origin according to researchers. They speculate that all three disorders may be caused by antibodies to the body’s own nerve cells because of a mistake by … Continue reading

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Doctor, patient expectations differ on fitness and lifestyle tracking

With apps and activity trackers measuring every step people take, every morsel they eat, and each symptom or pain, patients commonly arrive at doctor’s offices armed with minutely detailed data they’ve been collecting about themselves. Yet health care providers lack … Continue reading

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Electronic Health Records Can Help Catch Undiagnosed Cases of Type 2 Diabetes

Newswise — In 2012, a group of UCLA researchers set out to mine thousands of electronic health records for a more accurate and less expensive way to identify people who have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The researchers got much more … Continue reading

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Obesity, colorectal cancer linked

Newswise — (PHILADELPHIA) — Obesity has long been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer, but the link has never been understood. Now, a research team led by investigators at Thomas Jefferson University has revealed the biological connection, and in … Continue reading

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Cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in Type 1 diabetes found, allowing for new treatment development

SAN ANTONIO (Oct. 1, 2015) — Research published Oct. 1 provides a molecular basis for why 80 percent of patients with longstanding Type 1 diabetes have chronic gastrointestinal symptoms including gastroparesis (delayed emptying of food), irritable bowel syndrome, abdominal distension … Continue reading

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Does Physical Activity Lower the Risk of Bacterial Infections?

Newswise — The risk of viral infections is known to be affected by physical activity, but little information is available regarding the more serious infections caused by bacteria. In this study, the investigators examined the relationship between leisure-time physical activity and suspected bacterial infections during a one-year follow up. Suspected bacterial infections were determined based on prescriptions for antibiotics. Via the use of Denmark’s unique civil registration number (an identification number assigned to all citizens at birth), it was possible to link health survey information with information from nationwide registries. Results showed that compared with sedentary behavior, low leisure-time physical activity was associated with a 10 percent lower risk of any suspected bacterial infection. Further, low and moderate levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with a 21 percent and 32 percent reduction of suspected cystitis (urinary tract bacterial infections), respectively – compared with individuals classified as sedentary. Suspected respiratory tract bacterial infections, however, were not associated with physical activity level. Click here to access the abstract.

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Rapid Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections Possible with New Device

Newswise — A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has developed a device with the potential of shortening the time required to rapidly diagnose pathogens responsible for health-care-associated infections from a couple of days to a matter of hours. … Continue reading

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Study Rules Out Spiders as Common Cause of Bacterial Infections in Humans

RIVERSIDE, Calif. – Can spiders be carriers of human pathogens? Can they provoke an infection through a break in the skin? A team of scientists, led by an entomologist at the University of California, Riverside, has data-mined the history of … Continue reading

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New test sorts viral vs. bacterial infections

DURHAM, N.C. – A blood test developed by researchers at Duke Medicine showed more than 90-percent accuracy in distinguishing between viral and bacterial infections when tested in people with respiratory illnesses. The test, which detects a specific genetic “signature” that … Continue reading

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Cystic Fibrosis: Chronic antibiotic therapy linked to fewer nontuberculous mycobacterial infections

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) often take antibiotics, including the macrolide azithromycin, for long periods to help manage their condition. But some doctors feared that chronic macrolide use might predispose people with CF to nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections. To examine … Continue reading

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Portable device provides rapid, accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis, other bacterial infections

A handheld diagnostic device that Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators first developed to diagnose cancer has been adapted to rapidly diagnose tuberculosis (TB) and other important infectious bacteria. Two papers appearing in the journals Nature Communications and Nature Nanotechnology describe … Continue reading

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Might there be an alternative to antibiotics for bacterial infections?

VIB researcher Mohamed Lamkanfi, connected to the Ghent University, discovered that mice that do not produce the receptor protein NLRP6, are better protected against bacterial infections and can easier remove bacteria from the body. Therapeutic drugs that neutralize NLRP6 could … Continue reading

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Hospitals are not reporting or preventing bacterial infections as well as they could: new study

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2012 Jan;33(1):20-8. Epub 2011 Nov 11. Frequent Hospital Readmissions for Clostridium difficile Infection and the Impact on Estimates of Hospital-Associated C. difficile Burden. Murphy CR, Avery TR, Dubberke ER, Huang SS. Source Division of Infectious Diseases … Continue reading

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Another rapid diagnostic test for bacterial infections

Bacterial infections really stink. And that could be the key to a fast diagnosis. Researchers have demonstrated a quick, simple method to identify infectious bacteria by smell using a low-cost array of printed pigments as a chemical sensor. Led by … Continue reading

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Serious bacterial infections in children linked to H1N1

The H1N1 influenza pandemic has led to a sharp increase in the number of children with a serious “secondary” bacterial infection called empyema in children. “Cases similar to those described here are likely to continue until the pandemic is over … Continue reading

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In children with fever, researchers can now distinguish bacterial from viral infections

In children with fever but no other symptoms of illness, it is difficult to know whether a child has a viral infection that will resolve on its own or a potentially serious bacterial infection that requires antibiotics. Now, researchers at … Continue reading

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Hidden tooth infections may predispose people to heart disease

According to a study carried out at the University of Helsinki, an infection of the root tip of a tooth increases the risk of coronary artery disease, even if the infection is symptomless. Hidden dental root tip infections are very … Continue reading

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The three-antibiotic combo that can kill MRSA staph infections: WUSTL

Newswise — Three antibiotics that, individually, are not effective against a drug-resistant staph infection can kill the deadly pathogen when combined as a trio, according to new research. The researchers, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, have … Continue reading

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Contacts and eye infections

People who wear contact lenses often acquire unwelcome microbial guests along with the convenience afforded by this eyewear. In fact, a higher diversity of bacteria lives on the eye surface of lens wearers than that of the naked-eye crowd, according … Continue reading

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Why Contact Lens Wearers May Get More Eye Infections

Newswise — Using high-precision genetic tests to differentiate the thousands of bacteria that make up the human microbiome, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center suggest that they have found a possible — and potentially surprising — root cause of the … Continue reading

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High-Dose Vitamin D Not Effective for Repeat Reproductive Tract Infections

Newswise — Columbus, OH. Women with the reproductive infection bacterial vaginosis (BV) do not benefit from high-dose vitamin-D supplementation, according to new research. The findings add to a body of conflicting data about a possible link between vitamin D – … Continue reading

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Little kids’ middle ear infections: a new cause

Newswise — WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Sept. 5, 2014 – Middle ear infections, which affect more than 85 percent of children under the age of 3, can be triggered by a viral infection in the nose rather than solely by a … Continue reading

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The tattoo inks that cause infections, according to FDA

Recently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) became aware of a problem after testing inks in home use tattoo kits marketed by White and Blue Lion, Inc. FDA has confirmed bacterial contamination in unopened bottles of the company’s inks. According … Continue reading

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Painkillers may aid those with urinary infections

Newswise — Women plagued by repeated urinary tract infections may be able to prevent the infections with help from over-the-counter painkillers, new research in mice shows. Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that inhibiting COX-2, … Continue reading

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Hospital-diagnosed maternal infections linked to increased autism risk

OAKLAND, Calif., Dec. 23, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Hospital-diagnosed maternal bacterial infections during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorders in children, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Autism and … Continue reading

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Antibacterial soaps not only don’t work, they may cause harm

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today issued a proposed rule to require manufacturers of antibacterial hand soaps and body washes to demonstrate that their products are safe for long-term daily use and more effective than plain soap and water … Continue reading

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Antibiotics for common infections in children should be limited: new CDC guidance

Every year as many as 10 million U.S. children risk side effects from antibiotic prescriptions that are unlikely to help their upper respiratory conditions. Many of these infections are caused by viruses, which are not helped by antibiotics. This overuse … Continue reading

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Aquarium-related skin infections often take a while to diagnose

DETROIT – A skin infection linked to exposure to contaminated water in home aquariums is frequently under-diagnosed, according to a Henry Ford Hospital study. Researchers say diagnosing and managing Mycobacterium marinum infection is difficult because skin lesions don’t appear for … Continue reading

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CDC underestimated antibiotic resistance among hospital-acquired infections

LOS ANGELES – (August 1, 2013) – The rise of antibiotic resistance among hospital-acquired infections is greater than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found in its 2008 analysis, according to an ahead-of-print article in the journal, Antimicrobial … Continue reading

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Circadian rhythms control body’s response to intestinal infections, UCI-led study finds

Irvine, Calif., May 31, 2013 — Circadian rhythms can boost the body’s ability to fight intestinal bacterial infections, UC Irvine researchers have found. This suggests that targeted treatments may be particularly effective for pathogens such as salmonella that prompt a … Continue reading

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Blood thinner Pradaxa may increase susceptibility to some viral infections

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. – A study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina indicates that a newly approved blood thinner that blocks a key component of the human blood clotting system may increase the risk and severity of … Continue reading

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Supporting Employees to Stand Up, Sit Less and Move More

Newswise — If you work in an office or behind a desk, chances are that you spend most of your day sitting. With too much sitting now linked to poor health, it is important to understand how to reduce the time that we sit, and whether this change can be maintained in the long term. This study examined the impact of an intervention designed to reduce the amount of time workers spend sitting. The investigators found that the intervention substantially reduced the sitting time of office workers both during work hours and across the day. Importantly, these changes were still seen after 12 months. The key next step is to adapt this intervention for wide-scale use by workplaces. Click here to access the abstract.

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Will wearables replace gym memberships for corporate wellness?

Market intelligence firm Tractica says wearables might be the next craze for the enterprise and industry sectors, as more businesses start to launch corporate wellness programs and integrate wearables into everyday work. Sales in the sector are expected to skyrocket … Continue reading

Posted in Science Updates | 1 Comment | Edit

How to Design a Corporate Wellness Plan That Actually Works: Harvard Business Review

Lately, there’s been some debate about whether workplace health promotion programs, more commonly known as wellness programs, work. To us, it’s similar to asking whether reviews, training programs, employee assistance services, or other company initiatives are effective for both worker performance … Continue reading

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5 Ways To Engage Employees In Your Corporate Wellness Program

Corporate wellness programs are successful only if people are engaged. When large amounts of people commit to living a healthier life, the results can be amazing. Lower health care costs, increased productivity, and improved morale are just the tip of … Continue reading

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Corporate Wellness Programs Lose Money: Harvard Business Review

Evidence that wellness programs lose money has been accumulating. This evidence has come not just from critics such as ourselves, but even from members of the wellness industry. In total, the evidence is compelling enough that companies planning or currently running … Continue reading

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Biggest corporate wellness lawsuit ever

Honeywell is not the first employer to be sued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission due to a wellness program, but it is the biggest. The EEOC filed its third suit Monday against the company, in part because employees can … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness entrepreneurs: Carrot and the stick is the wrong model

Just this summer the California Healthcare Foundation sponsored a contest to help physicians understand a patient’s life outside the four wall of the doctor’s office. It is clear that many big employers see that part of the healthcare system – … Continue reading

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An Overlooked Benefit of Corporate Wellness Programs

KANSAS CITY, Mo., Nov. 20, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — In a world where rising healthcare costs have become the norm, employers frequently rely on corporate wellness programs to help reduce the costs of healthcare claims. While the benefits of creating a … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness player Virgin HealthMiles adds two engineering VPs

FRAMINGHAM, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Virgin HealthMiles, Inc., the market leader in the rapidly growing corporate wellness category, today announced that it has added Steven Shi and Chiang Ying Yi to the company’s executive team. Shi has been named the company’s vice president … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness ROI study kicks off in the midwest

Newswise — AMES, Iowa – Controlling health care costs is crucial for Iowa manufacturers to remain competitive. But a big question for many companies is whether investing in an employee wellness program will cut costs and improve productivity. To help … Continue reading

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Uh-oh. Corporate wellness plans do not work: RAND study

(Reuters) – A long-awaited report on workplace wellness programs, which has still not been publicly released, delivers a blow to the increasingly popular efforts, Reuters has learned, casting doubt on a pillar of the Affordable Care Act and a favorite … Continue reading

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Drugstores may be the future operators of most corporate wellness clinics

CHICAGO, Jan. 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — United Airlines today announced the opening of the airline’s new employee health clinic at O’Hare International Airport. The clinic, managed by Walgreens, will serve a broad scope of employees’ health needs, such as urgent care … Continue reading

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US Corporate Wellness earns re-accreditation as a Comprehensive Wellness Provider

Washington, D.C., September 18th, 2012 – URAC announced that US Corporate Wellness is among a very select group of national providers to earn re-accreditation as a Comprehensive Wellness Provider. After having become one of the first in the country to … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness program snapshot: data, stats, charts, graphs

Featured By: The ComplianceAndSafety Blog   Browse books on how-to-make “infographics” like the one above See other articles about Corporate Wellness, Science Updates

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Corporate wellness company GlobalFit expands senior staff

PHILADELPHIA–(BUSINESS WIRE)–GlobalFit, the leading provider of physical activity programs for American businesses, today formally announced six recent hires. These staffing additions have been made to address the increased demand in the company’s corporate wellness initiatives, specifically with large companies and … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness ROI book a blockbuster in the making

More corporate wellness posts “This is a must-read for anyone involved in developing policy or making purchase decisions on programs that try to improve health and save money.” —Bob Galvin, Chief Executive Officer, Equity Healthcare (Blackstone Group); co-founder, Leapfrog Group; … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness games that benefit all stakeholders

BELLEVUE, WA–(Marketwire – May 1, 2012) – Henry Albrecht, CEO of Limeade, Inc., suggests that incorporating gaming techniques into company wellness programs exponentially ups engagement, a key ingredient to wellness program success. Limeade is an enterprise wellness platform that builds … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness industry growth: new data

NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)–More employers continue to start wellness programs, and the majority of organizations with programs currently in place are looking to invest and expand, according to the 2011 Willis Health and Productivity Survey by Willis North America’s Human Capital … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness programs leaping forward: major new survey from Rush University Medical Center

(CHICAGO) – Organizations in the Chicago area report an increase of health-improvement and wellness programs according to a survey conducted in September 2011 by Aon Hewitt in partnership with Rush Health. The survey results will be released at the 9th … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness ROI strategy book due mid year

Thompson Publishing Group has announced an agreement with Brad Cooper, CEO of national wellness provider US Corporate Wellness to write their latest book titled Employee Wellness: Implementing a High ROI, High Impact Strategy. US Corporate Wellness is the premier Colorado-based … Continue reading

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How corporate wellness programs beat rising healthcare costs: new white paper

PHILADELPHIA, PA–(Marketwire – Feb 22, 2012) – As healthcare costs continue to strap employers’ cash reserves, Penn National Insurance (PNI) has maintained annual increases 75% below the national average for three years running. The role played by the corporate wellness … Continue reading

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Uh oh: corporate wellness programs didn’t show results in this study: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2012

HealthWorks: results of a multi-component group-randomized worksite environmental intervention trial for weight gain prevention Jennifer A Linde, Katherine E Nygaard, Richard F MacLehose, Nathan R Mitchell, Lisa J Harnack, Julie M Cousins, Daniel J Graham and Robert W Jeffery For … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness company HealthFitness has 100 job openings

MINNEAPOLIS, Dec. 15, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Corporate leadership at HealthFitness is serious about the business of employee health— so serious that treadmill workstations are at the heart of its new Minneapolis office, and a HealthFitness-managed fitness center is located just one … Continue reading

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Social health company HealthRally, which develops incentive programs for corporate wellness, gets funding

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–HealthRally, a social health company developing a new crowdfunding platform for personal health motivation, announced that it raised more than $400,000 in seed funding and assembled an expert board of strategic advisors. “Games and badges are great, but … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness company wins technology award in NJ

NORTH BRUNSWICK, N.J., Nov. 19, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — Switch2Health (S2H) was named Early-Stage Company of 2011 by the New Jersey Technology Council. Seth A. Tropper, president and CEO of S2H, accepted the award at the NJTC Awards Gala held at … Continue reading

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Corporate wellness success, ROI, is driven by incentives

Healthcare costs are escalating rapidly and globally, accounting for greater shares of the GDP of developed world nations—their threat to national economies exceeds any other single cost item. It is no wonder that individuals, families, employers, communities and governments are … Continue reading

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ACSM Says Yoga May Not Count Toward 30 Minutes of Daily Physical Activity, but May Have Other Benefits

Newswise — Hatha yoga is an increasingly popular form of physical activity and meditative practice in the U.S. It is important to understand the calorie cost and intensity of yoga in relation to the national physical activity guidelines, such as those recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the American Heart Association (AHA). These guidelines encourage 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days of the week. This study was a systematic review that evaluated published research investigations that have directly measured the calorie cost of yoga and calculated the metabolic intensity (METS) of individual yoga poses including a popular sequence called “sun salutations.” Based on ACSM/AHA classification, the intensity of holding most poses and of full yoga sessions ranged from light (less than 3 METS) to moderate-intensity (3-6 METS), with the majority classified as light-intensity. A few sequences/poses, including the sun salutations, met the criteria for moderate-intensity activity. The health benefits of yoga, however, should not be discounted. The regular practice of yoga may also increase strength, balance and flexibility, calm the mind and reduce stress. Click here to access the abstract.

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Yoga as therapy

Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2016 Aug;24:145-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2016.06.005. Epub 2016 Jun 16. Yoga research review. Field T1. Author information 1Touch Research Institute, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, United States; Fielding Graduate University, United States. Electronic address: tfield@med.miami.edu. Abstract … Continue reading

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International Day of Yoga is Today

On Dec. 11, 2014 a wildly popular resolution was introduced to the United Nations General Assembly. A record number of countries – 175 – were willing to co-sponsor, making it so popular, it was adopted without a vote. But the resolution was not … Continue reading

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Hatha Yoga practice decreases menopause symptoms and improves quality of life

Complement Ther Med. 2016 Jun;26:128-135. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.03.014. Epub 2016 Mar 22. Hatha Yoga practice decreases menopause symptoms and improves quality of life: A randomized controlled trial. Jorge MP1, Santaella DF2, Pontes IM3, Shiramizu VK4, Nascimento EB5, Cabral A6, Lemos TM7, … Continue reading

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Asthma symptoms may be relieved by yoga

(Reuters Health) – Yoga seems to provide small improvements in symptoms and quality of life in people with asthma, according to a new review. The practice of yoga includes breathing exercises, postures (called asanas), and meditation. Yoga has been proposed … Continue reading

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Yoga improves quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation

Sophia Antipolis – 14 March 2016: Yoga improves quality of life in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, according to research published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.1 Heart rate and blood pressure also decreased in patients who did … Continue reading

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Adapted Yoga Feasible, Beneficial for Adults with Traumatic Brain Injury

Newswise — A research team, led by an IU School of Health and Rehabilitation faculty member at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, has determined that adapted yoga is both feasible and beneficial for adults with stroke or traumatic brain injury. Subjects … Continue reading

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Yoga is being recommended more for some patients with heart disease

Newswise — Yoga practitioners have been touting yoga’s psychological and physical benefits for more than 5,000 years. Increasingly, yoga is being recommended for some patients with heart disease. Valley Medical Group’s Center for Integrative Medicine, located in Ridgewood, NJ recently … Continue reading

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Certain Yoga Positions May Impact Eye Pressure in Glaucoma Patients

Newswise — NEW YORK, NY – January 07, 2015 – Glaucoma patients may experience increased eye pressure as the result of performing several different head-down positions while practicing yoga, according to a new study published by researchers at New York … Continue reading

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The impact of yoga on atrial fibrillation: A review of The Yoga My Heart Study.

J Arrhythm. 2015 Dec;31(6):337-8. doi: 10.1016/j.joa.2015.05.001. Epub 2015 Jun 6. The impact of yoga on atrial fibrillation: A review of The Yoga My Heart Study. Deutsch SB1, Krivitsky EL1. Author information 1University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, 1 … Continue reading

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6 Yoga Exercises You Won’t Be Embarrassed to Do at Your Desk

Many of us sit behind our desks and stare at computer screens for far too much of the day. Although concentrated work can be beneficial to our jobs, it can be taxing on our bodies. The following yoga exercises will … Continue reading

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Yoga may not reduce all-cause mortality

Complement Ther Med. 2015 Dec;23(6):757-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.08.004. Epub 2015 Aug 18. Yoga participation and all-cause mortality: National prospective cohort study. Loprinzi PD1. Author information 1Center for Behavioral Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, … Continue reading

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Prostate cancer, yoga, and side effects: new info

PHILADELPHIA — Men with prostate cancer who are undergoing radiation therapy can benefit from yoga, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania reported at the Society of Integrative Oncology’s 12th International Conference. The new, first-of-its-kind … Continue reading

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Americans who practice yoga report better wellness, health behaviors

People who practiced yoga or took natural products (dietary supplements other than vitamins and minerals) were more likely to do so for wellness reasons than to treat a specific health condition, according to analysis of data from the 2012 National … Continue reading

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Hot. Yoga. Not.

Olga Khazan In the 10 years I’ve been doing yoga, I’ve been to hundreds of classes on three continents. I enjoyed stretching alongside C-list celebrities on conflict-free mats in Los Angeles as much as I liked standing on my head … Continue reading

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Yoga safety has been questioned. Here’s proof that it is safe.

Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 26. pii: kwv071. [Epub ahead of print] The Safety of Yoga: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Cramer H, Ward L, Saper R, Fishbein D, Dobos G, Lauche R. Abstract As yoga … Continue reading

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How yoga became a global phenomenon

Millions around the world recognize the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day, but as of 2015, June 21 also represents another global celebration: the International Day of Yoga. Two billion people in nearly 200 countries, including the United States, … Continue reading

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Yoga “holds the answers to life’s greatest challenges”

From a rebellious young woman with a dangerous heroin habit to a globe-trotting fashion model to “First Lady of Yoga” (The New York Times), Colleen Saidman Yee tells the remarkable story of how she found herself through the healing power … Continue reading

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The Woman Who Helped Bring Yoga to the West

When the woman who would become Indra Devi was born in Russia in 1899, yoga was virtually unknown outside of India. By the time of her death, in 2002, it was being practiced everywhere, from Brooklyn to Berlin to Ulaanbaatar. … Continue reading

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YOGA: Top 100 Yoga Poses with Pictures!: Yoga, Yoga for Beginners, Yoga Poses, Yoga for Weight Loss

Yoga is getting more and more popular nowadays. Many famous celebrities such as Jennifer Aniston, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, and Charlize Theron all practice yoga to keep their bodies fit and good-looking. Contrary to the popular belief, yoga is not … Continue reading

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Yoga improves cardiovascular risk factors, including central obesity and blood pressure: Diabetol Metab Syndr.

Diabetol Metab Syndr. 2015 Apr 30;7:40. doi: 10.1186/s13098-015-0034-3. eCollection 2015. Effects of 1-year yoga on cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged and older adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized trial. Siu PM1, Yu AP1, Benzie IF1, Woo J2. Author information 1Department … Continue reading

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Yoga and Chronic Pain Have Opposite Effects on Brain Gray Matter: American Pain Society

Newswise — PALM SPRINGS, May 15, 2015 — Chronic pain is known to cause brain anatomy changes and impairments, but yoga can be an important tool for preventing or even reversing the effects of chronic pain on the brain, according … Continue reading

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The Effects of a Hatha Yoga Intervention on Facets of Distress Tolerance: New Study in Cogn Behav Ther

Cogn Behav Ther. 2015 May 8:1-13. [Epub ahead of print] The Effects of a Hatha Yoga Intervention on Facets of Distress Tolerance. Medina J1, Hopkins L, Powers M, Baird SO, Smits J. Author information 1a Department of Psychology , University … Continue reading

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Meditation and yoga’s mental health benefits documented in new Dutch study

Yoga practitioners know firsthand the physical and mental benefits the activity produces, as meditation is often embedded in yoga sessions. Now, yogis have got science to back their claims of well-being and focus, as new research shows more clearly how … Continue reading

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Yoga classes do not violate students’ religious rights, Californian court rules

Yoga taught in a public school is not a gateway to Hinduism and does not violate the religious rights of students or their parents, a California appeals court has ruled. An appeal court in San Diego upheld a lower court … Continue reading

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More children doing yoga, taking sleep supplements

(Reuters Health) – – A growing number of American children are bending into downward dog and other yoga poses, according to a new report on complementary health practices. The report analyzed National Health Interview Survey data on practices outside of … Continue reading

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Childhood Muscular Fitness and Adult Metabolic Syndrome

Newswise — About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In this longitudinal study, investigators examined associations between childhood muscular fitness (strength, endurance, and power) and metabolic syndrome – the latter assessed once they reached adulthood. The results suggest that higher levels of childhood muscular fitness might protect against developing metabolic syndrome in adult years. Further, this relationship was found to be independent of the childhood cardiorespiratory fitness levels. For example, those with the highest muscular fitness at ages 9-15 years, had an 80 percent lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome in adulthood – in comparison to those who had low muscular fitness levels during childhood. Supporting the current World Health Organization physical activity guidelines, these results highlight the importance of both muscular strengthening activities and aerobic exercise. Overall, the study supports that a combination of increased muscular fitness, increased cardiorespiratory fitness and decreased adiposity in childhood may reduce future risk metabolic syndrome. Click here to access the abstract.

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Metabolic Syndrome Components are Associated with Increased Prostate Cancer Risk

Med Sci Monit. 2015 Aug 14;21:2387-96. doi: 10.12659/MSM.893442. Metabolic Syndrome Components are Associated with Increased Prostate Cancer Risk. Zhang JQ1, Geng H2, Ma M3, Nan XY4, Sheng BW3. Author information 1Department of Nutrition, The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, … Continue reading

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Higher levels of serum lycopene are associated with reduced mortality in individuals with metabolic syndrome

Nutr Res. 2016 May;36(5):402-7. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2016.01.003. Epub 2016 Jan 9. Higher levels of serum lycopene are associated with reduced mortality in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Han GM1, Meza JL2, Soliman GA3, Islam KM1, Watanabe-Galloway S4. Author information 1Department of Epidemiology, … Continue reading

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Long naps, daytime sleepiness tied to greater risk of metabolic syndrome

Taking long naps or being excessively tired during the day is associated with a higher risk for developing metabolic syndrome, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the American College of Cardiology’s 65th Annual Scientific Session. Specifically, napping for … Continue reading

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Magnesium status and the metabolic syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Nutrition. 2016 Apr;32(4):409-17. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2015.09.014. Epub 2015 Oct 23. Magnesium status and the metabolic syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Sarrafzadegan N1, Khosravi-Boroujeni H2, Lotfizadeh M3, Pourmogaddas A4, Salehi-Abargouei A5. Author information 1Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan … Continue reading

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Plant fiber may fuel obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome: Penn State researcher

An excess of bacteria in the gut can change the way the liver processes fat and could lead to the development of metabolic syndrome, according to health researchers. Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions including obesity, type 2 diabetes, … Continue reading

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Dairy inversely associated with metabolic syndrome

Diabet Med. 2015 Oct 3. doi: 10.1111/dme.12970. [Epub ahead of print] Dairy consumption and risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis. Kim Y1, Je Y1. Author information 1Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea. Abstract AIMS: To … Continue reading

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Effect of laser acupuncture combined with a diet-exercise intervention on metabolic syndrome in post-menopausal women

J Adv Ress. 2015 Sep;6(5):757-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jare.2014.08.002. Epub 2014 Aug 19. Effect of laser acupuncture combined with a diet-exercise intervention on metabolic syndrome in post-menopausal women. El-Mekawy HS1, ElDeeb AM1, Ghareib HO2. Author information 1Department of Physical Therapy for Women’s … Continue reading

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Staggering metabolic syndrome numbers in US

Newswise — Nearly 35 percent of all U.S. adults and 50 percent of those 60 years of age or older were estimated to have the metabolic syndrome in 2011-2012, according to a study in the May 19 issue of JAMA. … Continue reading

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A Widely Used Food Additive Promotes Colitis, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

Newswise — ATLANTA—Emulsifiers, which are added to most processed foods to aid texture and extend shelf life, can alter the gut microbiota composition and localization to induce intestinal inflammation that promotes the development of inflammatory bowel disease and metabolic syndrome, … Continue reading

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Metabolic syndrome can be prevented by healthy gut microbiota

Newswise — ATLANTA—Promoting healthy gut microbiota, the bacteria that live in the intestine, can help treat or prevent metabolic syndrome, a combination of risk factors that increases a person’s risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to researchers at … Continue reading

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Partly replacing meat products with soy products could help prevent metabolic syndrome

Partly Replacing Meat Protein with Soy Protein Alters Insulin Resistance and Blood Lipids in Postmenopausal Women with Abdominal Obesity 1,2 First published July 9, 2014, doi: 10.3945/jn.114.193706 J. Nutr. September 1, 2014 vol. 144 no. 9 1423-1429 Monique van Nielen, … Continue reading

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Instant noodles drive metabolic syndrome

Instant Noodle Intake and Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Distinct Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Korea1,2,3,4 First published June 25, 2014, doi: 10.3945/jn.113.188441 J. Nutr. June 25, 2014 jn.113.188441 Hyun Joon Shin5,10, Eunyoung Cho8,13, Hae-Jeung Lee11, Teresa T. Fung5,12, Eric Rimm5,6,8, … Continue reading

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Metabolic syndrome may be effectively treated with this drug

(SALT LAKE CITY)—University of Utah researchers have discovered that an enzyme involved in intracellular signaling plays a crucial role in developing metabolic syndrome, a finding that has a U of U spinoff company developing a drug to potentially treat the … Continue reading

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Metabolic syndrome has no explicit effect on bone fractures: BMC Endocrine Disorders

Association between metabolic syndrome and bone fractures: a meta-analysis of observational studies Kan Sun, Jianmin Liu, Nan Lu, Hanxiao Sun and Guang Ning BMC Endocrine Disorders 2014, 14:13 doi:10.1186/1472-6823-14-13 Published: 9 February 2014 Abstract (provisional) Background Emerging epidemiological evidence suggest … Continue reading

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Poor breakfast in youth linked to metabolic syndrome in adulthood

1256 breakfast cookbooks, ranked in order of user reviews It is often said that breakfast is important for our health and a study conducted by Umeå University, published in Public Health Nutrition supports this claim. The study revealed that adolescents … Continue reading

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Voluntary exercise and green tea enhance the expression of genes related to energy utilization and attenuate metabolic syndrome in high fat fed mice

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2013 Dec 27. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201300621. [Epub ahead of print] Voluntary exercise and green tea enhance the expression of genes related to energy utilization and attenuate metabolic syndrome in high fat fed mice. Sae-Tan S, Rogers CJ, … Continue reading

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Overweight, obese are risks for heart disease regardless of metabolic syndrome

Being overweight or obese are risk factors for myocardial infarction (heart attack) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) regardless of whether individuals also have the cluster of cardiovascular risk factors known as metabolic syndrome, which includes high blood pressure, high cholesterol … Continue reading

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Diabetes community does not agree on definition of metabolic syndrome

Impact of HbA1c criterion on the definition of glycemic component of the metabolic syndrome: the China health and nutrition survey 2009 Xingxing Sun, Tingting Du, Rui Huo, Xuefeng Yu and Lixian Xu BMC Public Health 2013, 13:1045 doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-1045 Published: 5 … Continue reading

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Does post-traumatic stress disorder increase the risk of metabolic syndrome?

New Rochelle, NY, October 1, 2013—People suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and death. A new study involving a comprehensive review of the medical literature shows that PTSD also increases an individual’s risk … Continue reading

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Sixteen weeks of resistance training can decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in healthy postmenopausal women: Clin Interv Aging

Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:1221-8. doi: 10.2147/CIA.S44245. Epub 2013 Sep 16. Sixteen weeks of resistance training can decrease the risk of metabolic syndrome in healthy postmenopausal women. Conceição MS, Bonganha V, Vechin FC, de Barros Berton RP, Lixandrão ME, Nogueira FR, … Continue reading

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Correlation between metabolic syndrome and knee osteoarthritis

Correlation between metabolic syndrome and knee osteoarthritis: data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES); Chang Dong Han, Ik Hwan Yang, Woo Suk Lee, Yoo Jung Park and Kwan Kyu Park; BMC Public Health 2013, 13:603 doi:10.1186/1471-2458-13-603; … Continue reading

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Naturopathic care helps reduce metabolic syndrome

Counselling and treatment with naturopathic care as well as enhanced usual care reduced the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a risk factor for heart disease, by 17% over a year for participants in a randomized controlled trial published in CMAJ. Researchers … Continue reading

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Grape intake may protect against metabolic syndrome-related organ damage

ANN ARBOR, MI – Consuming grapes may help protect against organ damage associated with the progression of metabolic syndrome, according to research presented Monday at the Experimental Biology conference in Boston. Natural components found in grapes, known as polyphenols, are … Continue reading

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Monounsaturated fats reduce metabolic syndrome risk

Canola oil and high-oleic canola oils can lower abdominal fat when used in place of other selected oil blends, according to a team of American and Canadian researchers. The researchers also found that consuming certain vegetable oils may be a … Continue reading

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College kids who don’t drink milk could face metabolic syndrome: University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences

URBANA – College-age kids who don’t consume at least three servings of dairy daily are three times more likely to develop metabolic syndrome than those who do, said a new University of Illinois study. The Home Creamery: Make Your Own … Continue reading

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Chronic sleep problems linked to disability later in life

(Reuters Health) – In adults of all ages, chronic sleep problems were linked with a greater risk of trouble with activities of daily living later in life, in a recent study.

Although disability rates have been falling, up to one in five seniors have at least one limitation in their ability to perform tasks, the researchers write in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

“Most people don’t get sufficient sleep – as a culture we tend to devalue sleep – and we tend to underestimate the potential impact of not getting adequate sleep,” lead author Elliot Friedman told Reuters Health by email.

Research has linked poor sleep to poor health, but little is known about how sleep affects daily functioning, said Friedman, a gerontologist at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana.

For the new study, Friedman analyzed survey data collected in 1995-1996 and then again in 2004-2006 from 3,620 people between the ages of 24 and 75 at the outset.

Participants answered questions about any sleep issues they had in the past year and their ability to complete daily living tasks such as bathing, dressing, and walking one block. They also reported on their ability to complete more difficult ‘instrumental’ tasks such as bending over, vacuuming, carrying groceries, climbing stairs, walking a mile, or running.

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Sleep and depression linkages explored

Medication is an important part of treatment for many patients with major depressive disorder, but the transition to antidepressants isn’t always smooth. It can take six weeks for a person to respond to pharmacotherapy. And with remission rates at about … Continue reading

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Researchers Identify Characteristic Chemical Signature for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Newswise — Dauer is the German word for persistence or long-lived. It is a type of stasis in the development in some invertebrates that is prompted by harsh environmental conditions. The findings are published online in the August 29 issue … Continue reading

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Chronic Lower Back Pain Relief Via Body Mechanics: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Newswise — WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – Oct. 6, 2014 – If you want to steer clear of lower back pain, remember this: Arch is good, flat is bad. Back pain is anything but rare; only headaches and colds are more common. … Continue reading

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For rheumatoid arthritis patients, exercise improves sleep quality, fatigue

J Rheumatol. 2014 Aug 15. pii: jrheum.131282. [Epub ahead of print] The Effect of Exercise on Sleep and Fatigue in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study. Durcan L, Wilson F, Cunnane G. Author information From the Department of Rheumatology, St. … Continue reading

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Dietary amino acids relieve sleep problems after traumatic brain injury in animals

PHILADELPHIA — A new study suggests a potential dietary treatment – a cocktail of key amino acids that improved sleep disturbances caused by brain injuries in mice – for millions of people affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI)—a condition that … Continue reading

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Chronic pain may be eased by attitude change

Related: Personality Characteristics of Patients with Pain Newswise — Chronic pain sufferers who learn to dwell less on their ailments may sleep better and experience less day-to-day pain, according to results of research conducted on 214 people with chronic face … Continue reading

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Chronic pain and stress reduced by group wellness programs

DETROIT, Aug. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — A group wellness program has been shown to significantly relieve pain and stress, and improve stress-related chronic illnesses, according to Henry Ford Hospital researchers. Henry Ford’s Center for Integrative Wellness conducted on-site group wellness … Continue reading

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Americans with Disability Act Amendments Q & A

The ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA) was enacted on September 25, 2008, and became effective on January 1, 2009. This law made a number of significant changes to the definition of “disability.” It also directed the U.S. Equal Employment … Continue reading

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Patients with moderate to severe TBI twice as likely to die from an unintentional injury

Research examining adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) who participated in rehabilitation showed that they were twice as likely to die from an unintentional injury that occurred following their TBI. This was in comparison to individuals in … Continue reading

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Should physiotherapy be the first point of contact in general practice?

Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Sep;17(5):489-502. doi: 10.1017/S1463423616000189. Epub 2016 Jun 6. Physiotherapy as a first point of contact in general practice: a solution to a growing problem? Goodwin RW1, Hendrick PA2. Author information 1Musculoskeletal Clinics Team,Nottingham City Care,Nottingham,UK. … Continue reading

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Gene related to Down syndrome and miscarriage identified

GENETICISTS have identified an enzyme which regulates the production of sperm and egg cells in human reproduction. The discovery furthers our understanding of a process which can often go wrong, resulting in miscarriage or infants born with Down’s Syndrome, Edwards’s … Continue reading

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Women’s long work hours linked to alarming increases in cancer, heart disease: Ohio State University

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. Work weeks that averaged 60 hours or more over three decades appear to … Continue reading

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American Migraine Foundation Offers Tips for Parents on Helping Their Children Cope with Migraine

Newswise — Although we may think of migraine as a disease of adults, it can also affect children of all ages. Some studies show migraine affects 6% of children and up to 28% of adolescents ages 15-17. To assist parents … Continue reading

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Mothers of children with autism benefit from peer-led intervention

Peer-led interventions that target parental well-being can significantly reduce stress, depression and anxiety in mothers of children with disabilities, according to new findings released today in the journal Pediatrics. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Vanderbilt University examined two treatment … Continue reading

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The most common major stressful event in Americans’ lives last year? Health.

  “…beautiful sounds of grandeur and serenity…” — Jeff Kingdon, review on Amazon, 1998Princeton, N.J. – A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) poll released today that examines the role of stress in Americans’ lives finds … Continue reading

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The little-known heart condition that affects mostly educated young women

BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127 doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127 Postural tachycardia syndrome is associated with significant symptoms and functional impairment predominantly affecting young women: a UK perspective Claire McDonald1, Sharon Koshi1, Lorna Busner2, Lesley Kavi2, Julia L Newton1 + Author Affiliations 1Institute for Ageing & … Continue reading

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Age, weight discrimination worse than race, sex discrimination and are linked to worse health in older adults

Perceived age and weight discrimination, more than perceived race and sex discrimination, are linked to worse health in older adults, according to new research from the Florida State University College of Medicine. The findings are part of a study measuring … Continue reading

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Sexuality, traumatic brain injury, and rehabilitation

Critical Review in NeuroRehabilitation Highlights Impact of TBI on Sexuality and Importance of Rehabilitation Strategies Each year more than three million Americans are living with traumatic brain injury (TBI), a condition that is associated with physical, cognitive, and emotional problems … Continue reading

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Type 2 diabetics’ reporting of pain, complications: new data

Almost half of adults with type 2 diabetes report acute and chronic pain, and close to one quarter report neuropathy, fatigue, depression, sleep disturbance and physical or emotional disability, according to a study of more than 13,000 adults conducted by … Continue reading

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Depression risk for stroke caregivers, a new study

Caregivers of stroke survivors are at risk for developing depression and complications from chronic stress, according to a study published by researchers at the Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON) in the latest issue of Biological Research … Continue reading

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How to stay out of nursing homes

Tired? Scientists have discovered another possible benefit of a night of restful and uninterrupted sleep. According to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health fragmented or interrupted sleep could predict future placement … Continue reading

Posted in Elder Care, Sleep | 2 Comments | Edit

Tinnitus, insomnia linked

Newswise — DETROIT – For the more than 36 million people plagued by tinnitus, insomnia can have a negative effect on the condition, worsening the functional and emotional toll of chronic ringing, buzzing, hissing or clicking in the head and … Continue reading

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Fibromyalgia symptoms get worse if you’re overweight: Mayo Clinic

ROCHESTER, Minn. — People with fibromyalgia can have difficulty getting a definitive diagnosis and finding an effective treatment plan. For many patients, the condition involves a confounding array of symptoms, including chronic pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance and mood disorders. One … Continue reading

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Alzheimer’s impact on family caregivers: new survey

KENSINGTON, Md., Oct. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ — A new survey released by the National Family Caregivers Association (NFCA) and Forest Laboratories, Inc. reveals what family caregivers fear most: first, their loved one’s general health and physical decline, and second, the … Continue reading

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Women’s neck, shoulder pain linked to psychological status

An increased response to experimental muscle pain is related to psychological status in women with chronic non-traumatic neck-shoulder pain. Anna Sjors, Britt Larsson, Ann L Persson and Bjorn Gerdle BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2011, 12:230doi:10.1186/1471-2474-12-230 Published: 12 October 2011 Abstract (provisional) … Continue reading

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Leading cause of older American deaths: falls

Every second of every day in the United States an older adult falls, making falls the number one cause of injuries and deaths from injury among older Americans.

In 2014 alone, older Americans experienced 29 million falls causing seven million injuries and costing an estimated $31 billion in annual Medicare costs, according to a new report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

The new numbers are being released in conjunction with the 9th Falls Prevention Awareness Day, sponsored by the National Council on Aging (NCOA). The observance addresses the growing public health issue and promotes evidence-based prevention programs and strategies to reduce the more than 27,000 fall deaths in older adults each year.

“Older adult falls are increasing and, sadly, often herald the end of independence,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Healthcare providers can make fall prevention a routine part of care in their practice, and older adults can take steps to protect themselves.”

With more than 10,000 older Americans turning 65 each day, the number of fall-related injuries and deaths is expected to surge, resulting in cost increases unless preventive measures are taken.

STEADI helps healthcare providers make fall prevention routine

To reduce older adult falls, CDC created the Stopping Elderly Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries (STEADI) initiative to help healthcare providers make fall prevention routine. STEADI is based on clinical guidelines and provides information and resources for patients, caregivers, and all members of the healthcare team. STEADI includes:

  • Information on how to screen for falls
  • Online training for providers
  • Videos on how to conduct functional assessments
  • Informational brochures for providers, patients and caregivers

At CDC, we’re working with healthcare providers to help keep older adults safe from falls. It all starts with three steps that healthcare providers can easily integrate into routine office visits.

At each visit, healthcare providers should:

  1. Ask patients if they have fallen in the past year, feel unsteady, or worry about falling.
  2. Review medications and stop, switch, or reduce the dose of medications that could increase the risk of falls.
  3. Recommend vitamin D supplements.

“Falls threaten older Americans’ independence and safety and generate enormous economic and personal costs that affect everyone,” said Grant Baldwin, Ph.D., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention. “Together, everyone can reduce the risk of falling and prevent fall injuries.”

Reduced muscle strength, increased inactivity, more severe chronic health conditions, and increased use of prescription medications are risk factors for falls among older Americans. Fall injury rates are almost seven times higher for older adults with poor health than for those with excellent health.

How older adults can reduce their risk of falling

Older adults also can take simple steps to prevent a fall:

  • Talk to your healthcare provider about falls and fall prevention. Tell your provider if you’ve had a recent fall. Although one out of four older Americans falls each year, less than half tell their doctor.
  • Talk to your provider or pharmacist about medications that may make you more likely to fall.
  • Have your eyes checked by an eye doctor once a year. Update eyeglasses as needed.
  • Participate in evidence-based programs (like Tai Chi) that can improve your balance and strengthen your legs. Contact your local Council on Aging for information about what is available in your community.
  • Make your home safer by getting rid of fall hazards.

For more information on the NCOA, see https://www.ncoa.org/.

For more information on CDC’s STEADI initiative, see https://www.cdc.gov/steadi.

For more information about Administration on Community Living falls prevention programs, see www.aoa.acl.gov/AoA_Programs/HPW/Falls_Prevention/index.aspx .

Also see

“Fear of Falling Can Cause You to Fall.” Tips to Help Older Adults Prevent Falls

As the National Council on Aging designates Sept. 22 as National Falls Prevention Day, NYIT Associate Professor Veronica Southard says older adults should be mindful of the risks of falling, but not let their fears take over their lives. “Fear … Continue reading

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Macronutrients Intake and Incident Frailty in Older Adults

J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Oct;71(10):1329-34. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glw033. Epub 2016 Mar 4. Macronutrients Intake and Incident Frailty in Older Adults: A Prospective Cohort Study. Sandoval-Insausti H1, Pérez-Tasigchana RF2, López-García E2, García-Esquinas E2, Rodríguez-Artalejo F2, Guallar-Castillón P3. Author … Continue reading

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Falls in the elderly can be predicted, three weeks early in some cases, according to the University of Missouri

“We have developed a non-wearable sensor system that can measure walking patterns in the home, including gait speed and stride length,” said Marjorie Skubic, who is both director of the University centre for elderly care and a professor of electrical … Continue reading

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After a Fracture, It’s Time to Rethink Medications

Newswise — BOSTON – With half of all women and a quarter of all men over fifty expected to suffer a fracture in the years ahead, the number of such injuries exceeds the incidence of heart attack, stroke, and breast … Continue reading

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Elderly fall risk may be mitigated by explosive strength training

Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2008 Dec;18(6):773-82. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2007.00732.x. Epub 2008 Jan 30. Explosive heavy-resistance training in old and very old adults: changes in rapid muscle force, strength and power. Caserotti P1, Aagaard P, Larsen JB, Puggaard L. Author information … Continue reading

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Wrist fractures linked to poor balance in elderly patients

Elderly patients suffering a low energy wrist (distal radius) fracture are more likely to have difficulties with balance, placing them at risk for future injuries, according to a new study appearing in the July 20, 2016 issue of the Journal … Continue reading

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Physical Declines Begin Earlier Than Expected Among U.S. Adults

Newswise — DURHAM and KANNAPOLIS, N.C. – Physical declines begin sooner in life than typically detected, often when people are still in their 50s, according to a Duke Health study that focused on a large group of U.S. adults across … Continue reading

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Occupational Therapy Study Finds Differences in Older Adults Who Fall Indoors Versus Outdoors

Falling can have serious consequences for older adults, including a loss of function and increased risk of institutionalization. According to a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, patient characteristics and outcomes differ for people … Continue reading

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To prevent falls, it may pay off to remodel the house

(Reuters Health) – Home renovations could be well worth the expense for older adults and people with a history of falls because they prevent injuries and might curb medical spending, a study in New Zealand suggests. The cost-benefit analysis found … Continue reading

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A how-to guide to prescribing exercise for chronic health conditions: Canadian Medical Association Journal

Exercise helps to alleviate the symptoms of many chronic health conditions such as knee osteoarthritis, low back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, heart disease and more, yet it is often overlooked as a treatment. A review in CMAJ … Continue reading

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Tai chi reduces fall risk in older adults: American Geriatrics Society

Recently, researchers compared the effects of tai chi to leg strengthening exercises (a physical therapy called “lower extremity training,” or LET) in reducing falls. Falls are a leading cause of serious injuries in older adults and can lead to hospitalization, … Continue reading

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Does physical exercise improve obstacle negotiation in the elderly?

Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Feb 11;64:138-145. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2016.02.008. [Epub ahead of print] Does physical exercise improve obstacle negotiation in the elderly? A systematic review. Guadagnin EC1, da Rocha ES2, Duysens J3, Carpes FP4. Author information 1Exercise Research Laboratory, Federal University … Continue reading

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Knee buckling treatment may help prevent falls in older adults

Symptoms of knee instability in older adults may indicate an increased risk of falling and of experiencing the various physical and psychological effects that can result from falling, according to a study published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal … Continue reading

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10 early signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s: Kansas State U expert

Newswise — MANHATTAN, Kan. – More than 5 million people in the United States have Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Not only is Alzheimer’s disease the sixth leading cause of death in the country, but it also currently … Continue reading

Posted in Alzheimer’s, Cognitive Impairment, Dementia, Elder Care, Elder Care: Falls | 1 Comment | Edit

Fall risk and vitamin D: new study

JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Jan 4:1-10. doi: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2015.7148. [Epub ahead of print] Monthly High-Dose Vitamin D Treatment for the Prevention of Functional Decline: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Bischoff-Ferrari HA1, Dawson-Hughes B2, Orav EJ3, Staehelin HB4, Meyer OW1, Theiler R5, Dick … Continue reading

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Vitamin D associated with increased risk of falling: JAMA Internal Medicine

Higher monthly doses of vitamin D were associated with no benefit on low extremity function and with an increased risk of falls in patients 70 or older in a randomized clinical trial, according to an article published online by JAMA … Continue reading

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Can Slow Walking Speed in Elderly Signal Alzheimer’s Disease Hallmarks?

Newswise — MINNEAPOLIS – How fast elderly people walk may be related to the amount of amyloid they have built up in their brains, even if they don’t yet have symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published in … Continue reading

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After routine cataract surgery, dizziness, but not fall risk, improves

Older people with visual impairment who undergo cataract surgery report less dizziness, but may be at the same risk of falls as before the surgery, according to a new study. You would have expected the fall rate to improve, said … Continue reading

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The Right Shoes for the Season: Preventing Winter Falls for Seniors

Newswise — TORONTO, November 25, 2015– Many parts of Canada saw their first snow fall and with it comes an increased risk of falls on snow and ice. The issue is most serious for those over the age of 65, … Continue reading

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Seniors, falls, and hospital readmissions

Newswise — DETROIT – A comprehensive care program that involves a team of specialists from multiple medical disciplines for treating injuries sustained from falls in older adults could help reduce hospital readmissions, according to researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in … Continue reading

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Senior Centers That Are Actually Fun

In the U.S., senior care is not something many entrepreneurs are thinking creatively about. Not so in Japan: In the past year, 60 gambling-themed senior-daycare centers have opened up, giving some of the nation’s elderly not just basic shelter, but … Continue reading

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Exercise program in senior centers helps decrease participants’ pain and improve mobility

It may seem counterintuitive that exercise could help people with arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions, but a new study finds that a low-impact exercise program is improving quality of life for many older adults with these conditions. The program, offered … Continue reading

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Muscle Loss Linked with Falls and Fractures in Elderly

Newswise — Older people with an age-related loss of muscle mass and strength may be at greater risk of falling and bone fractures, according to new research led by the University of Southampton. A study by an international team of … Continue reading

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Falls: tai chi vs. combined exercise prescription

J Back Musculoskelet Rehabil. 2015 Oct 26. [Epub ahead of print] Tai Chi vs. combined exercise prescription: A comparison of their effects on factors related to falls. Yıldırım P1, Ofluoglu D2, Aydogan S3, Akyuz G4. Author information 1Department of Physical … Continue reading

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Physical Activity and Falls in Older Men: Do Mobility Limitations Make a Difference?

Newswise — Moderately vigorous physical activity (MVPA) is good for all older men, and according to new research conducted at University College London (UK), it also reduces the risk of falls in some over-70s. One third of men aged 70-90 … Continue reading

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See what a button battery can do to a child’s throat

A button battery can cause devastating harm to a child if it gets lodged in their throat. Medical correspondent Fergus Walsh demonstrates what can happen – by using a piece of ham.

Also see

Button battery foreign bodies in children: hazards, management, and recommendations.

Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:846091. doi: 10.1155/2013/846091. Epub 2013 Jul 11. Button battery foreign bodies in children: hazards, management, and recommendations. Thabet MH, Basha WM, Askar S. Source: Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, … Continue reading

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Holiday hazards such as button batteries hidden in toys, cards

COLUMBUS, OH–(Marketwire – Nov 18, 2011) – Seventy five percent of shoppers are expected to buy electronics this season, but before you buy even a single gift, a doctor at Nationwide Children’s Hospital is urging you to pay close attention. … Continue reading

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Button battery swallowing by infants and elderly is the subject of a CPSC warning

Small, coin-sized batteries can be found in products in nearly every home in America. From the flashlight sitting on the table, to the remote control next to the TV, “button batteries” as they are commonly referred to, are in thousands … Continue reading

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HP Recalls Batteries for HP and Compaq Notebook Computers Due to Fire and Burn Hazards

Recall date: June 23, 2016 Recall number: 16-202 Previous Next Enlarge HP Notebook computer battery Download Share Recall Summary Name of product: HP lithium-ion batteries Hazard: The battery packs can overheat, posing fire and burn hazards. Remedy: View Details Replace … Continue reading

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Energizer Bunny needs warning label

In today’s technology-driven world, batteries, especially button batteries, are everywhere. They power countless gadgets and electronic items that we use every day. While they may seem harmless, button batteries can be dangerous if swallowed by children. A new study conducted … Continue reading

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Curiosity leads us to seek out unpleasant, painful outcomes

Curiosity is a powerful motivator, leading us to make important discoveries and explore the unknown. But new research shows that our curiosity is sometimes so powerful that it leads us to choose potentially painful and unpleasant outcomes that have no … Continue reading

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Posted in Pediatric Health: Injuries | Leave a comment

Vitamin B Levels During Pregnancy Linked to Eczema Risk in Child

Newswise — Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown.

The study from the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, is the first to link maternal serum levels of nicotinamide, a naturally occurring vitamin, and related metabolites to the risk of atopic eczema in the child.

The researchers believe the findings support the concept that eczema partly originates as a baby develops in the womb and could reveal ways of reducing the risk of the skin condition.

Dr Sarah El-Heis, the study’s lead researcher from the University of Southampton, comments: “Nicotinamide cream has been used in the treatment of eczema but the link between the mother’s levels of nicotinamide during pregnancy and the offspring’s risk of atopic eczema has not been previously studied. The findings point to potentially modifiable influences on this common and distressing condition.”

Nicotinamide is a form of vitamin B3. Its level is maintained through intake of foods such as fish, meat, chicken, mushrooms, nuts and coffee as well as tryptophan, an amino acid found in most proteins. Nicotinamide and related nutrients are important for the body’s immune responses and energy metabolism.

The research, published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy, assessed the amount of nicotinamide and related tryptophan metabolites during pregnancy in 497 women that took part in the Southampton Women’s Survey. The rates of eczema in their children at ages 6 and 12 months was studied.

Results showed that offspring of mothers with higher levels of nicotinamide had a 30 per cent lower chance of developing atopic eczema at 12 months. There was an even stronger association with higher levels of anthranilic acid, a tryptophan metabolite.

Nicotinamide can improve the overall structure, moisture and elasticity of skin and therefore could potentially alter the disease processes associated with eczema, the researchers say. The study showed a gradual association between higher maternal nicotinamide and anthranilic acid levels and a lower risk of atopic eczema, suggesting that the development of eczema is not simply prevented by the presence of these nutrients.

Professor Keith Godfrey, Director of the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre in Nutrition, added: “More research is needed to investigate this interesting association, but the findings are further evidence of the potential benefits of eating a healthy balanced diet during pregnancy.”

Posted in Dermatology: Eczema, Nutrition: Vitamin B Complex | Leave a comment

Holiday binge eating season has begun; ends a month after last holiday; weight takes many months to lose

Around the world, weight gained from holiday feasting takes months to lose, a study found.

Christmas Day in particular is a holiday that appears to pack on the pounds: in a study of some 3,000 individuals in three countries, Americans showed an average 0.4% weight gain (P<0.001) from 10 days before Christmas to 10 days after; Germans gained 0.6% more weight (P<0.001); and the Japanese 0.5% (P=0.005).

U.S. participants packed on 0.7% more weight in total during the full Christmas-New Year holiday season, but the Germans had us beat with a 1.0% weight gain, according to Brian Wansink, PhD, of Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. and colleagues.

The data came from a year-long study, published as a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine, in which people were given wireless scales and asked to weigh themselves regularly.

In each country, sharp spikes in weight gain were seen around their major food-forward holidays.

Thanksgiving, for example, was another holiday tied to weight gain in the U.S., with Americans putting on an additional 0.2% of their weight (P<0.001). Golden Week and Easter served up the same for the Japanese (0.3% gain, P<0.001) and Germans (0.2% gain, P<0.001), respectively.

More

Also see

Detecting eating disorders in college students home for the holidays

DENVER, CO–(Marketwire – Dec 14, 2011) – As college freshmen across the U.S. return home for the holidays, thousands of parents will — for the first time — discover eating disorders that developed during their child’s first semester. Because the … Continue reading

Posted in Nutrition: Eating Disorders, Nutrition: Eating Disorders: Anorexia, Nutrition: Eating Disorders: Bulimia, Nutrition: Eating Disorders: Orthorexia Nervosa, Nutrition: Eating Disorders: Pica | Comments Off on Detecting eating disorders in college students home for the holidays | Edit

Altering meal frequency has little impact on body weight, plasma lipids, or glucoregulatory factors

Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2016 Oct;23(5):379-383. Meal frequency and timing: impact on metabolic disease risk. Varady KA1. Author information 1Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Abstract PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of … Continue reading

Posted in Cholesterol, Metabolic Disease, Metabolic Syndrome, Nutrition: Appetite, Nutrition: Calorie Restriction, Nutrition: Habits | Leave a comment | Edit

To consistently eat differently, you must learn to think differently

Most diet programmes work at first. We lose a few pounds in a few weeks, but then life happens and the bad habits and the weight return. This is where diets fail us and why The Diet Trap Solution is … Continue reading

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10 college-roommate conflict tips

Newswise — This is the time of year when roommate tensions increase. After weeks of living together with a roommate, many for the first time, anxiety and stress over the living arrangement may overwhelm some students. As students return home … Continue reading

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… ’tis also the season to overindulge, then beat yourself up for overindulging

The holidays are supposed to be all about comfort and joy, but they’re more often about discomfort and self-disgust, at least for women. Not only ’tis the season to shop ’til you drop, ’tis also the season to overindulge, then … Continue reading

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Posted in Nutrition: Binge Eating, Nutrition: Habits | Leave a comment

Popeye was Right: There’s Energy in that Spinach

Newswise — Using a simple membrane extract from spinach leaves, researchers from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed a bio-photo-electro-chemical (BPEC) cell that produces electricity and hydrogen from water using sunlight. The raw material of the device is water, and its products are electric current, hydrogen and oxygen. The findings were published in the August 23 online issue of Nature Communications.

The unique combination of a man-made BPEC cell and plant membranes, which absorb sunlight and convert it into a flow of electrons highly efficiently, paves the way for the development of new technologies for the creation of clean fuels from renewable sources: water and solar energy.

The BPEC cell developed by the researchers is based on the naturally occurring process of photosynthesis in plants, in which light drives electrons that produce storable chemical energetic molecules, that are the fuels of all cells in the animal and plant worlds.

In order to utilize photosynthesis for producing electric current, the researchers added an iron-based compound to the solution. This compound mediates the transfer of electrons from the biological membranes to the electrical circuit, enabling the creation of an electric current in the cell.

The electrical current can also be channeled to form hydrogen gas through the addition of electric power from a small photovoltaic cell that absorbs the excess light. This makes possible the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy that is stored as hydrogen gas formed inside the BPEC cell. This energy can be converted when necessary into heat and electricity by burning the hydrogen, in the same way hydrocarbon fuels are used.

However, unlike the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels – which emit greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide) into the atmosphere and pollute the environment – the product of hydrogen combustion is clean water. Therefore, this is a closed cycle that begins with water and ends with water, allowing the conversion and storage of solar energy in hydrogen gas, which could be a clean and sustainable substitute for hydrocarbon fuel.

The study was conducted by doctoral students Roy I. Pinhassi, Dan Kallmann and Gadiel Saper, under the guidance of Prof. Noam Adir of the Schulich Faculty of Chemistry, Prof. Gadi Schuster of the Faculty of Biology and Prof. Avner Rothschild of the Faculty of Material Science and Engineering.

“The study is unique in that it combines leading experts from three different faculties, namely three disciplines: biology, chemistry and materials engineering,” said Prof. Rothschild. “The combination of natural (leaves) and artificial (photovoltaic cell and electronic components), and the need to make these components communicate with each other, are complex engineering challenges that required us to join forces.”

The study was conducted at the Nancy and Stephen Grand Technion Energy Program (GTEP) and carried out at the Technion’s Hydrogen Lab, which was established under the auspices of the Adelis Foundation and GTEP. It was funded by the I-CORE (Israeli Centers of Research Excellence) program of the Council for Higher Education’s Planning and Budgeting Committee, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 152/11), a special grant from the United States – Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), and the German-Israeli Project Cooperation Program (DIP).

The Technion-Israel Institute of Technology is a major source of the innovation and brainpower that drives the Israeli economy, and a key to Israel’s renown as the world’s “Start-Up Nation.” Its three Nobel Prize winners exemplify academic excellence. Technion people, ideas and inventions make immeasurable contributions to the world including life-saving medicine, sustainable energy, computer science, water conservation and nanotechnology. The Joan and Irwin Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute is a vital component of Cornell Tech, and a model for graduate applied science education that is expected to transform New York City’s economy.

American Technion Society (ATS) donors provide critical support for the Technion—more than $2 billion since its inception in 1940. Based in New York City, the ATS and its network of supporters across the U.S. provide funds for scholarships, fellowships, faculty recruitment and chairs, research, buildings, laboratories, classrooms and dormitories, and more.

Also see

Popeye was right! Spinach’s fitness benefits updated in new study

J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2014 Jun 12. [Epub ahead of print] The effect of spinach supplementation on exercise-induced oxidative stress. Bohlooli S1, Barmaki S, Khoshkhahesh F, Nakhostin-Roohi B. Author information 1Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of … Continue reading

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Spinach extract curbs appetite, sugar cravings: Lund University research

Green leafy vegetables: more articles Thylakoid, a compound hidden away in spinach and other green leaves, slows down food digestion and therefore makes us feel fuller, according to research at Lund University in Sweden. A spinach extract high in thylakoids … Continue reading

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Fresh market spinach: new growing strategies

SALINAS, CA–Throughout California’s fertile central coast region, fresh spinach is a high-production, high-value crop. Spinach can be finicky, requiring sufficient nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation to ensure ideal growth, and to meet industry quality standards such as its defining deep green … Continue reading

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E. coli in spinach reduced with new technique

University of Illinois scientists have found a way to boost current industry capabilities when it comes to reducing the number of E. coli0157:H7 cells that may live undetected on spinach leaves. “By combining continuous ultrasound treatment with chlorine washing, we … Continue reading

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Spinach recall, Fresh Express, 18 states

Fresh Express Incorporated is conducting a voluntary, precautionary recall of a limited quantity of Fresh Express Spinach with a Use-by Date of November 7 and Product Code of S299B25 due to a possible health risk from Salmonella. No illnesses or … Continue reading

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Spinach recall, Kroger’s, 15 states, Listeria

CINCINNATI, Wednesday, September 19 – The Kroger Co. (NYSE:KR) Family of Stores in 15 states is asking customers to check their refrigerators for certain Kroger Fresh Selections Tender Spinach 10 ounce packages (UPC: 0001111091649) with a “best if used by” … Continue reading

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Why spinach makes us strong: the science

Nitrate, which is found naturally in spinach and other vegetables, has a powerful effect on muscle strength. Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have now uncovered how this happens by identifying two relevant proteins, the production of which is stimulated by the … Continue reading

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Organic baby spinach recall for Salmonella

Taylor Farms Retail, Inc. is initiating a voluntary recall of Organic Baby Spinach with the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella following a random test conducted on a finished package of spinach by USDA. Salmonella is an organism which can … Continue reading

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Spinach recall for E. coli

December 23, 2011 – Avon Heights Mushrooms, in full cooperation with the FDA is recalling certain packages of fresh packaged spinach. The brands include Krisp Pak 1 Ooz bags, Better Brand 10oz.bags, and Avon Heights 4-2.51b bags. The implicated packages … Continue reading

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New spinach recall for Salmonella

Church Brothers, LLC is voluntarily recalling 560 bags of clipped spinach as a precautionary measure after one bag tested positive for Salmonella during a random USDA Microbiological Data Program sampling. The recalled product was processed on October 6, 2011 and … Continue reading

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Publix spinach dip recall because of Listeria

Publix Recalls Spinach Dip Due To Possible Health Risk FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – September 26, 2011 – Publix Super Markets is issuing a voluntary recall for spinach dip because it may be adulterated with Listeria monocytogenes. The problem was discovered … Continue reading

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Organic spinach recall in California, Arizona, Nevada for Listeria monocytogenes

Fresh & Easy Neighborhood Market Inc., is voluntarily recalling fresh Organic Baby Spinach with the Enjoy by date of Aug 01 sold under the f&e™ label. The recall notification is being issued out of an abundance of caution based on … Continue reading

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Vitamin K intake and all-cause and cause specific mortality

Clin Nutr. 2016 Aug 30. pii: S0261-5614(16)30216-3. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2016.08.017. [Epub ahead of print] Vitamin K intake and all-cause and cause specific mortality. Zwakenberg SR1, den Braver NR2, Engelen AI3, Feskens EJ4, Vermeer C5, Boer JM6, Verschuren WM7, van der Schouw … Continue reading

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Pomegranate juice could have favorable effects on oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes

Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2016 Sep 16:1-7. [Epub ahead of print] Effects of pomegranate juice consumption on oxidative stress in patients with type 2 diabetes: a single-blind, randomized clinical trial. Sohrab G1, Ebrahimof S2, Sotoudeh G3, Neyestani TR4, Angoorani … Continue reading

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Eating Your Greens Could Enhance Sport Performance

Newswise — Nitrate supplementation in conjunction with Sprint Interval Training in low oxygen conditions could enhance sport performance a study has found. Researchers from the University of Leuven in Belgium carried out a study with twenty-seven moderately trained participants. These … Continue reading

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Eating Yogurt Is Not Enough: Rebalancing The Ecosystem Of ‘The Microbes Within Us’

Ed Yong, author of I Contain Multitudes, says someday we might be able to improve our health by taking probiotics, but “we are still in the very early stages of working out how to do this.” More The Mind-Gut Connection: … Continue reading

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Veggie Juice That Illuminates the Gut

The medical imaging drink, developed to diagnose and treat gastrointestinal illnesses, is made of concentrated chlorophyll, the pigment that makes spinach green Newswise — BUFFALO, N.Y. — The pigment that gives spinach and other plants their verdant color may improve … Continue reading

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What do our cravings say about our health?

Newswise — After a stressful day, it’s almost second nature to laze on the couch and drown our sorrows in a bowl of ice-cream or potato chips. Soon, we glance down and realize we’ve managed to consume the entire pint … Continue reading

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CRF Frozen Foods Expands Voluntary Recall to Include All Frozen Vegetable and Fruit Products Due To Possible Health Risk

PASCO, Wash. – As a precaution, CRF Frozen Foods of Pasco, Washington is expanding its voluntary recall of frozen organic and traditional fruits and vegetables. We are performing this voluntary recall in cooperation with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) … Continue reading

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New Blood Thinners Reduce Atrial Fibrillation Stroke Risk Without Frequent Monitoring

Newswise — MAYWOOD, IL – A new generation of blood thinners can reduce the risk of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, without requiring frequent monitoring and dietary restrictions. But special attention must be given to the patient’s age, kidney … Continue reading

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The Elements of a Healthy Diet, and How to Change

By Leo Babauta One of the best things I ever did to change my life (along with exercise, mindfulness, simplicity and focus) is to teach myself to eat a healthy diet. But one of the things that confused me early … Continue reading

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Moderate Alcohol Use Linked to Heart Chamber Damage, Atrial Fibrillation in New Study

Enjoy a glass of wine with dinner or a nightcap before bed, but don’t count on their heart benefits.

A new study by UC San Francisco researchers found that even moderate alcohol consumption may change the structure of the heart in ways that increase the risk of atrial fibrillation.

“There’s growing evidence that moderate alcohol intake may be a risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disturbance in the world, but the mechanism by which alcohol may lead to atrial fibrillation is unknown,” said Gregory Marcus, MD, endowed professor of atrial fibrillation research at UCSF and senior author of the study published Sept. 14, 2016, in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Possible Pathway Between Alcohol and Atrial Fibrillation

Marcus and colleagues looked at damage to the left atrium of the heart as a possible pathway between alcohol and atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a known risk factor for stroke. The irregular pumping of blood can lead to blood clots, which may travel to the brain and cause stroke.

The researchers evaluated data from more than 5,000 adults collected over several years in the Framingham Heart Study, including echocardiograms, medical history and self-reported alcohol intake. The study participants, mostly white and in their 40s to 60s, reported on average just over one drink per day. The overall rate of atrial fibrillation in the group was 8.4 cases per 1,000 people per year – meaning over a 10-year period, eight out of 100 people were likely to develop atrial fibrillation.

Every additional drink per day was associated with a 5 percent increase in the yearly risk. Every additional drink per day also was associated with a statistically significant 0.16 millimeter enlargement of the left atrium, highlighting a possible site of physical damage caused by drinking.

Complex Relationship Between Alcohol and Heart Health

The new findings shed light on the complex relationship between alcohol and heart health – one that likely precludes blanket advice on drinking habits, said Marcus.

Research has shown that moderate drinking can reduce the risk of heart attack while increasing the risk of atrial fibrillation. Marcus’s team captured this conundrum in a study published earlier this year looking at hospital admissions in dry and wet counties of Texas. They found that patients in counties permitting alcohol sales were more likely to have atrial fibrillation but less likely to have heart attacks and congestive heart failure.

Alcohol’s abilities to protect and harm the heart likely operate through different mechanisms and vary from person to person, said Marcus. The work in his group seeks to decipher these mechanisms, which will inform therapies for heart conditions and may ultimately enable physicians to give personalized advice to patients.

“I’m constantly trying to remind people that there are various forms of heart disease and not all are related to heart attack,” said Marcus, who is also a practicing cardiologist. “Atrial fibrillation is growing in importance as our success in preventing heart attack grows.”

He added that one pattern, revealed by UCSF’s Health eHeart Study, is clear – people who believe alcohol is good for the heart tend to drink more.

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Greater Alcohol Use May Reduce Heart Attacks, Increase Atrial Fibrillation

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Moderate alcohol consumption may increase risk of atrial fibrillation in people with heart disease

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High Levels of Intense Exercise May Be Unhealthy for the Heart

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Injected alcohol may ease nerves that cause atrial fibrillation

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Detecting atrial fibrillation, stroke risk in women: a new simple method

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Atrial fibrillation ignorance at 25 per cent level in older adults

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Atrial fibrillation in fertile women is triggered by obesity

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Atrial fibrillation is the new epidemic of CVD

Despite recent advances in the treatment of heart rhythm disturbances, mortality and morbidity rates associated withy atrial fibrillation (AF) remain “unacceptably high”, according to a new report. The report, prepared jointly by the German Competence Network on Atrial Fibrillation (AFNET) … Continue reading

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Alcohol consumption tied to heart problems in new research

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Lengthy ER visits for psychiatric patients often result in transfer, not treatment

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Ignoring a minor stroke ups risk for more strokes soon after

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Excess Weight May Shrink the Brain’s White Matter

Middle-age spread is not only unattractive and a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Those who are overweight or obese at middle age—roughly, age 40—appear to have much less white matter in their brains than people of the same age … Continue reading

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How neuroinflammation contributes to neurodegeneration

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Afib: Poor Short-Term Outcomes More Common After Stenting

A history of atrial fibrillation (Afib) was a “harbinger” of death after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), researchers suggested. Hitinder S. Gurm, MBBS, of the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center in Ann Arbor, and colleagues reported online in the Journal of … Continue reading

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Obesity on the rise in adults with a history of cancer

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The Dangers of Snake-Oil Treatments for Autism

When her daughter was diagnosed with autism in 2004, Ariane Zurcher threw herself into researching a condition she knew nothing about. Everything she read indicated a bleak future for Emma, then a toddler. It led Zurcher to believe Emma would never form deep relationships, and would probably lack empathy. She might have compulsive behaviors and meltdowns or try to harm herself. She might never speak or be toilet-trained, and, once Zurcher and her husband died, she might have to be institutionalized. Zurcher says she felt as though she were “descending into hell.”

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